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Tag Archives: Tutorial

Tutorial: DIY Flames

Welcome to tutorial for modelling Flames. Here I will present to you a Step-by-step guide on how to create fantastic, highly detailed flames for miniatures in a matter of seconds.

Blazing flamethrowers, crackling braziers, torches or balls of magical fire – in the world of miniatures wargames flames add a lot of character and dynamic to our favorite tiny characters. With 3d printing prevalence and a lot of bitz selling companies getting your hands on some awesome parts has never been easier. Still why pay and wait, when you can make your own flames of chosen size and shape in a matter of seconds and from materials you probably already have at home!


Before we start, as usual, please take note that what works for me might not necessarily work for you.

You will need:

  • Super Glue,
  • PVA Glue,
  • Wooden Toothpicks,
  • Hobby Cutters,

Step one: Foundation

It is best to start by finding a base shape to build the flame around. It can be anything solid including toothpick, wire, piece of plastic, or even the miniatures themselves. In this case, with an idea of flames gushing out of a flamethrower, I cut a small piece of a toothpick.  


Step two: Ingredients

Next I poured few small drops of PVA glue onto the piece of toothpick. Just enough to cover the wider end. Right after that, while PVA was still wet, I poured Super Glue on top and moved the shape around so that Super Glue covered entire PVA beneath.


Step three: Shape

Here’s where modelling kicks in. I used another toothpick to mix both glues and guide a quickly hardening ‘paste’ around and finally in one direction to form a cone. The mix creates an organic, irregular texture when drying, which provided additional detail to the flame.

It might seem difficult at first, but once you get how the ‘paste’ behaves it will be as simple as barely few moves of a toothpick to get a desired cone. 


Three steps, that’s all it takes. With a bit of practice the process takes less than a minute and can be applied to any surface. Below are just some examples of the results:

I hope you find this tutorial interesting. Be sure to let me know your thoughts in the comments below or via Facebook or Instagram. I would also appreciate if you considered sharing this content with your friends, who might find it useful. Finally if you are looking for a professional miniatures painting service, be sure to contact me with this contact form. I always reply within 24 hours, after which please check out your spam folder.

Scarhandpainting

Tutorial: Painting Warhammer 40,000 Crimson Fists part one Blue Armor

Welcome to Painting Warhammer 40,000 Crimson Fists tutorial. Here I will present to you a Step-by-step of an easy and fast painting process for Games Workshop Crimson Fists Primaris Marines armor as can be seen in Gallery: Crimson Fists.

Before we start, some notes:

  • This tutorial require airbrush.
  • You can use any paints, not just the ones I recommend. You can use this chart to compare paints between popular brands.
  • Please note pictures present a huge miniature under strong light that might result in a feel of messy and clumsy paint job.
  • As usual, please take note that what works for me might not necessarily work for you.

Step one: Undercoat

I started with a thorough layer of Games Workshop Chaos Black spray. This is a standard procedure for me. Chaos Black spray is my go to choice when it comes to undercoat.

Step two: Base Color

For the initial layer I chose Vallejo Model Air – French Blue (71.088). The color is a somewhere medium tone blue, with much vibrancy that got a bit toned down by black undercoat beneath. I applied a thin, dry layer of French Blue by airbrushing it on top and around the miniature. I took extra care not to make the layer too strong.

Step three: Highlight

Next I applied a mix of Vallejo Game Air – Ultramarine Blue (72.722) proportioned 5:2 with Vallejo Model Air – Light Sea Blue (71.089). This layer was also airbrushed, but this time I applied it zenithally and on the most exposed areas of the armor. Once again I took extra care to keep the layer dry and soft.

Step four: Shading

I then applied Vallejo Wash for Dark Vehicles (76.518) by airbrushing it from the bottom of the miniature (reverse zenithal) and onto low parts of large areas, including lower shoulder guards, sides of leg armor and lower part of the backpack. This particular paint is very thin, forcing me to apply it by multiple tiny, mist-like “puffs”, that dried out almost instantly. It significantly toned down all the armor and blended any dry specks leftovers from previous layers.

Step five: First Highlight

Next I switched to manual brush and applied an edge highlight of Citadel Layer – Hoeth Blue. I picked only the most exposed edges, skipping all places that were too difficult to reach or hidden from sight.

Step Six: Second Highlight

Finally I applied an edge highlight with Vallejo Game Color – Glacier Blue (72.095). Contrary to previous layer, I kept this one concentrated on top areas and corners, adding extra focus and depth to the exposed armor detail.


That wraps up the armor. Only five layers of paint for an eye catching effect of dark blue armor, that stands out on the gaming board. Now with this solid base out of the way, we can start building character of the miniatures, by adding more colors and enriching the overall feel of the miniatures – but that is a topic for another day. Stay tuned for part two of the tutorial. 

I hope you find this tutorial interesting. Be sure to let me know your thoughts in the comments below or via Facebook or Instagram. I would also appreciate if you considered sharing this content with your friends, who might find it useful. Finally if you are looking for a professional warhammer 40k miniatures painting service, be sure to contact me with this contact form. I always reply within 24 hours, after which please check out your spam folder.

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Tutorial: Unlimited Tiny Balls for Modelling

Forget about tiresome Greenstuff rolling! From now on, when modelling Lava bases, the only thing you’ll need to do is to pick a ready-to-use tiny ball from a box! Below is a short guide on how to gain access to unlimited tiny modelling balls.

Remember that time when you laboriously rolled about three dozen Greenstuff balls only to drop half of them on the messy floor and then accidentally squash the rest to a pulp? From this day onward traumatic events like this are forever left behind you. No more rolling, no more squashing! As of now you will be able to draw an unlimited number of tiny balls, perfect for any kind of miniatures modelling, from these three sources:


Source one: Desiccant Silica Gel

Most clothes and shoes comes pack with a tiny bag of Desiccant. Inside you will find few dozen Silica Gel balls of varied sizes. These work well with typical miniatures hobby paints and are perfect for overall modelling. 


Source two: Cosmetic Glass Balls

These super tiny glass balls come in small packs and can be obtained from many places including cosmetic stores, Amazon and Ali-express. Different sizes and colors make it a perfect modelling material.


Source three: Air Soft Guns Ammunition

Yup, you read this correctly. Air Soft Gun ammo is just a bunch of tiny balls. Usually ceramic, plastic or metal sold in packs of hundreds. The latter might be a bit expensive and inconvenient, but ceramics and plastics are great for our hobby. 


Below some practical use examples:

I hope you find this article entertaining. Be sure to let me know your thoughts in the comments below or via Facebook or Instagram. I would also appreciate if you considered sharing this content with your hobby buds, who might find it useful. Finally if you are looking for a professional miniatures painting service be sure to contact me via this contact form. I always reply within 24 hours, after which please check out your spam folder.

Cheers!

Scarhandpainting

Tutorial: Magnetizing GW Bases

Magnetized bases is nowadays new hotness when it comes to miniatures transportation. This solution allows for comfortable transportation and fast deployment of your army. Once commited to this form of handling your plastic dudesmen, you will probably go back and magnetize all of your stuff. Regardless of choice of container, be it a professional carrying case like A-Case, or just a plain paper box with a piece of metal mounted at the bottom, first thing to do is actually magnetizing the bases.

And here’s where word of mouth and slight issues might discourage you from this glorious path to ultimate wargaming comfort. The internet is full of common misconceptions about magnetized miniatures. That is because a lot of hobbyists decide to go the most straightforward way and just glue a random magnet to the underside of a base YOLO style. This might result in a magnet falling off a base mid-transport, which in turn might transform your precious collection into a pile of scrap. Below I will show you how to avoid this fate with a very easy life hack.


Before we start, some notes:

  • This tutorial focuses on Games Workshop bases specifically as they tend to have empty undersides. 

  • For conveniences sake I highly recommend magnetizing bases before painting.

  • Please take note that what works for me might not necessarily work for you.

Let’s start by toppling the topic of magnets falling off a base. This happens because the entirety of miniature’s weight is held in place by a relatively tiny spot of contact between a magnet and a base. The smaller the area of contact and the heavier a miniature – the more probable a COVFEFE in your carrying case. To avoid this, but also keep the size of magnets reasonable, I propose to use sockets. A socket extends the area of contact to the sides of a magnet and greatly increases strength with which the magnet is held in place. A proper material for a socket will also increase the bond between the magnet and plastic base.

Another thing is choosing a right size and the amount of magnets for each miniature. Personally I tend to go with two magnets for infantry, three to four for large infantry and cavalry and more for anything larger, depending on weight. The size of these varies depending on what bases I work with. For Games Workshop bases I go with 5x2mm magnets, which work as a charm, providing just enough strength to keep miniatures in place, but not as much as to prevent me from comfortably picking the miniatures. 


Boy oh boy, so much theory… “where’s the actual tutorial?!” you might ask. Ok, let’s just go straight for the easy step-by-step.

You will need:

  • 5x2mm Neodymium Magnets
  • 2mm thick foamed PVC (or similar material)
  • Cyanoacrylate Super Glue
  • 5mm thick drill
  • Modelling knife

Step one: the PVC

Start by drilling holes in the PVC one beside another with few mm in-between. No need to be very precise. Once done, use a hobby knife to cut the PVC into small two-holes pieces, as seen in the picture below. These are now “sockets” to hold the magnets in. Test if all sockets fit the bases, make some adjustments if necessary.

Step two: Mounting Sockets

Turn the base upside down, apply some Super Glue onto the surface and glue the socket on top. Avoid sticking your fingers through the holes as you might end up becoming one with the base by accident 🙂

Step three: the Magnets

Apply Super Glue into the sockets and glue the magnets in. Try to glue all the magnets in same direction for better effect. I found that it is better to put the magnet just barely into the socket, then flip the base and push it on top of a flat surface. This way the magnet will slide inside a socket up to a level of the base’s edge, thus providing good connection to a future metal transportation surface. 


Hey! That’s it! These three simple steps will greatly increase your magnets (and miniatures) survivability during transportation. I’ve been using this solution for couple of years now, with no bad experience what so ever and I hope it will work for you just as well. 



I hope you find this tutorial interesting. Be sure to let me know your thoughts in the comments below or via Facebook.or Instagram. I would also appreciate if you considered sharing this content with your hobby buds, who might find it useful. Finally if you are looking for a professional miniatures painting service be sure to contact me via this contact form. I always reply within 24 hours, after which please check out your spam folder.

Cheers!

Scarhandpainting

Tutorial: Vallejo Plastic Putty

Working with miniatures on a day by day basis has it’s merits, one of which is getting to test awesome hobby related stuff! I ordered Vallejo Plastic Putty to fill up the shopping cart, rather than because I actually needed it. Or so I thought. Boy oh boy how wrong I was! As it turned out I secretly longed for the Plastic Putty to be a part of my life.

Long story short: I have been using this ‘liquid magic’ for a whole day now and just had to share my hype with you.
What can you do with Plastic Putty? For starters you can fill all kind of gaps with it. Once dry, you can file it, scratch it, cut it, paint on top of it… and more! 

Below is just one example of Vallejo Plastic Putty application in practice.


Looks simple? Well, that’s because it is! This method is super fast. Just apply your Plastic Putty onto a crack, then use a tissue to rub the excess off crosswise. Let it dry. Done! Forget about Liquid Greenstuff – from this day onward Plastic Putty is all you need. 😉 

But in all seriousness – this stuff is pure awesome. 

If you like the article, consider sharing it with someone who likes hobbying around with miniatures. Find me on Facebook and Instagram. Most importantly have a great hobby time!

Scarhandpainting

Tutorial: Painting Five Layers Technique Metal

Welcome to Painting Five Layers Technique – Metal tutorial. Here I will present to you a Step-by-step of an easy and fast painting process for metal, that I myself use in most of my projects.

Before we start, some notes:

  • Five Layers Technique is a self developed, easy to learn, simple and rewarding technique I myself use on regular basis. It is a great way to prepare groundwork for a particular color, or as an end result on a large scale project. To learn more about the technique visit: Tutorial: Five Layers Technique
  • This tutorial does not require airbrush.
  • You can use any paints, not just the ones I recommend. You can use this chart to compare paints between different brands.
  • Please note pictures present a huge miniature under strong light that might result in a feel of messy and clumsy paint job.
  • For the purpose of this tutorial I used Games Workshop Stormcast Eternal free sample miniature.
  • As usual, please take note that what works for me might not necessarily work for you.

Prep: Undercoat

I started with a thorough layer of Games Workshop Chaos Black spray.

Step one: Base layer

I then applied first layer (base) with GW Warplock Bronze. Thinning the paint down a notch might help leading the paint to recesses and speed up the process. 

Step two: Bronze Highlight

Next, with a side of a large brush tip, I applied a layer of Army Painter True Copper. The movement and technique behind this layer was similar to flatbrushing. The key was to leave some of the previous layer visible in recesses, all the while applying new color to everything beyond. 

Step two alt: Metal Highlight

I did the same for weapon, except I switched to Army Painter Gun Metal, instead of True Copper. 

Step three: Edge highlight

Next I edge highlighted all areas with Army Painter Shining Silver. This one does not have to be precise and might get a bit messy. Any additional scratches or lines painted on the armor will benefit the final result. 

Step four: Wash

The Army Painter Strong Tone was next. I applied a rich layer of wash all over the miniature.
NOTE: I recommend applying and highlighting any colors compatible with Strong Tone before commencing this step. Proper layer planning is key to achieving fast painting time. For this tutorial I left the rest of the miniature as is. 

Step five: Highlight

Finally I edge highlighted with Army Painter Shining Silver. I also painted few additional scratches and lines to add diversity to some areas. 

Job complete. It is just that simple. Now you have a nice base to add depth and additional detail with color washes/glazes, or you can just leave it as is, if you prefer. Below are some examples of Metal painted with Five Layers Technique. 


I hope you find this tutorial interesting. Be sure to let me know your thoughts in the comments below or via Facebook or Instagram. I would also appreciate if you considered sharing this content with your friends, who might find it useful. Finally if you are looking for a professional miniatures painting service be sure to contact me with this contact form. I always reply within 24 hours, after which please check out your spam folder.

Scarhandpainting

Tutorial: Resurrecting Games Workshop Glazes

Being a commission painter, or even just a casual hobbyist, might see you grow attached to a certain line of paints. What if suddenly these paints become out of production? Having to change one’s painting habits is rough. Being left in a middle of a project, without means to continue seems even worse!

I’ve been hobbying for over twenty years now. Easy to say I have seen my share of paints going OOP. Been on a receiving end of such blows far too many times. The most recent and by far most painful was Games Workshop’s removal of the amazing Glaze series. Using these as Washes, Glazes and even Mix ingredients I grew to love them. No amount of Contrast paints will fill the void, as these are a thing of their own with different qualities and behavior.

And thus after burning (or rather flowing) though my stash of GW Glazes I started searching for a stable source of substitute. I experimented with Army Painter, Privateer Press, Games Workshop and more. In the end salvation came from Vallejo. It turned out their Game Inks are already pretty close to old GW Glazes. Few tweaks saw these pretty much spot on. See for yourself.


Lamenters Yellow

Recipe:

Vallejo Game Ing 72.085 Yellow 1 drop

Water 2 drops


Bloodletter:

Recipe:

Vallejo Game Ink 72.086 Red 4 drops

Vallejo Game Ing 72.085 Yellow 1 drop

Water 10 drops


Waywatcher Green

Recipe:

Vallejo Game Ink 72.089 Green 3 drops

Vallejo Game Ing 72.085 Yellow 2 drops

Water 10 drops


Guilliman Blue

Recipe:

Vallejo Game Ink 72.088 Blue 1 drop

Water 2 drops

There you have it. I hope this will help you refill your own bottles of old GW Glazes.

If you like the article, consider sharing it with someone who likes hobbying around with miniatures. Find me on Facebook and Instagram. Most importantly have a great hobby time!

Scarhandpainting

Tutorial: Painting KoW Armada Empire of Dust Monolith

Welcome to Painting Empire of Dust Monolith tutorial. Here I will present to you a Step-by-step of an easy and fast painting process for Mantic Games Empire of Dust Monolith as can be seen in Gallery: Armada Empire of Dust.

Before we start, some notes:

  • This tutorial require airbrush.
  • You can use any paints, not just the ones I recommend. You can use this chart to compare paints between different brands.
  • Please note pictures present a huge miniature under strong light that might result in a feel of messy and clumsy paint job.
  • As usual, please take note that what works for me might not necessarily work for you.

Step one: Undercoat

I started with a thorough layer of Games Workshop Chaos Black spray.

Step two: Deck

I airbrushed Vallejo Khaki (air) over main deck and all top structures. I then flatbrushed GW Flayed One Flesh on top of Khaki layer. 

Step three: Broadside

I airbrushed Vallejo Panzer Dark Grey (air), followed by a layer of Vallejo Cold Grey (air). 

Step four: Gold

I then painted front and side ornaments, plus some additional detail with GW Warplock Bronze, followed by a solid flatbrush of P3 Molten Bronze and a highlight of Army Painter Shining Metal.

Step five: Wash

I then applied a lot of wash mix of Army Painter Strong Tone Ink 1:1 Army Painter Soft Tone Ink.
(If you followed my other tutorials you know at this point that the mixture is one of my very best friends in all painting.)

Step six: Main highlights

Once wash was dry I drybrushed broadsides with Vallejo Medium Sea Grey and then with Vallejo Ghost Grey. (I forgot to take pics). I then flatbrushed deck and top structure elements with GW Flayed One Flesh and edge highlighted with Vallejo Off White.

Step seven: Blue

I added accents of blue by manually painting chosen elements with Vallejo Magic Blue (air). I then highlighted with Vallejo Electric Blue, followed with Vallejo Glacier Blue. Furthermore I applied a wash layer of GW Guilliman Blue (glaze). Finally I added points of focus and thin highlights with Vallejo Glacier Blue. 

Step Eight: Purple/Pink

I applied Vallejo Warlock Purple onto chosen areas, including top gem, piramid inner lines and catapult flames. I then applied couple successive highlights with different mixes of Vallejo Warlock Purple and Vallejo Off White. With few highlights made with pure Vallejo Off White I moved to glaze Army Painter Purple Tone Ink into few areas of choice. This was contained mostly to top gem and recesses in catapult flames (and around). 

Such prepared miniature I airbrushed with two coats of Vallejo Polyurethane Matt Varnish and mounted on a base, following Tutorial: KoW Armada Water Bases


I hope you find this tutorial interesting. Be sure to let me know your thoughts in the comments below or via Facebook or Instagram. I would also appreciate if you considered sharing this content with your friends, who might find it useful. Finally if you are looking for a professional miniatures painting service be sure to contact me with this contact form. I always reply within 24 hours, after which please check out your spam folder.

Scarhandpainting

Tutorial: Painting Post-apo Survivors part 1 Stalkers

Welcome to Painting Road to Survival Stalkers tutorial. Here I will present to you a Step-by-step of an easy and fast painting process for Orzol Studio’s Stalkers team from the Post-apo Survivors Kickstarter.

Before we start, some notes:

  • This tutorial require airbrush.
  • You can use any paints, not just the ones I recommend. You can use this chart to compare paints between different brands.
  • Please note pictures present a huge miniature under strong light that might result in a feel of messy and clumsy paint job.
  • Pictures names don’t match steps in this tutorial. This is because I re-used pictures made for an Instagram tutorial. Sorry if this causes confussion.
  • As usual, please take note that what works for me might not necessarily work for you.

Step one: Undercoat

I applied a strong layer of Citadel Chaos Black spray. I prefer spray over manual application, but this is just a personal preference. Any matt black undercoat will do, as long as it’s thorough.

Step two: Uniform 

I started by applying a strong layer of Vallejo Dark Green RLM71 (air) onto entire uniform. I used an airbrush for this, but it is not necessary. This layer might as well be applied manually, but might take few runs to look smooth and solid. Although boots, weapons and other detail got painted alongside the uniform, it’s not a problem. If you switch to manual painting you don’t have to worry about messing these up at this stage of paint job.

Next I airbrushed Vallejo Interior Green (air) over previous layer. Similarly to Dark Green this one can be done manually and follows same philosophy.

I switched to manual painting and with a basecoat size brush, flatbrushed a mix of Vallejo Interior Green (air) 1:1 Vallejo Heavy Khaki over the miniature. I then used a more precise brush and highlighted some edges with the same color mix.

Step three: Vest

With a solid color underneath a single layer of Vallejo Russian Green (air) was enough to provide a smooth base for the vest. The key was to avoid messing up all the bright uniform around. Because of that I outlined the vest with a precise brush and only then switched for a larger brush to gain speed.

Next I flatbrushed a mix of Vallejo Russian Green 1:1 Vallejo Olive Green over previous layer. This provided nice thickness, something the upcoming Wash will work good on.

Step four: Boots, Gloves, Mask

Using a small brush I applied a strong, precise layer of Vallejo Panzer Dark Grey (air) onto boots, mask, gloves, weapons and buckles.

I then switched to Vallejo Medium Sea Grey, thinned it down with medium and applied a somehow misty, irregular layer over Panzer Dark Grey, leaving spots of previous color visible. I deliberately left weapons and buckles be for the time being.

Step five: Brown wash

Using a large, soft brush I applied a lot of Games Workshop Agrax Earthshade onto entire miniature. After a while I used a clean precise brush to strip some of the paint from areas where too much pigmentation covered all the detail. I left the miniature to dry after that.

Step six: Weapons

I applied a partially translucent layer of thinned down Vallejo Wolf Grey (air) onto weapons and buckles. I moved a brush alongside blade and barrel, trying to leave pigmentation on the edges.

I then highlighted weapons with Games Workshop Pallid Wych Flesh. Mostly on the edges and with no dillution.

I then followed up by applying Army Painter Dark Tone Ink. Similar to Agrax, I let the paint flow then removed the excess and let the thing dry.

Finally I edge highlighted with Games Workshop Pallid Wych Flesh. This time around I included gas mask filter plus added few scratches here and there.

Step seven: Skin & Eyes

I started painting skin by applying a solid layer of slightly thinned down Vallejo Tan. This layer had to be precise and I avoided going out of line and messing up paintjob around it. I deliberately started painting skin before applying Agrax Earthshade Wash from previous tutorial so that any corrections could be done much easier, if required.

I then applied Games Workshop Dwarf Flesh onto previous layer. Same premise, except I left just a bit of Tan visible in the recesses.

Next I highlighted skin with Vallejo Flesh (air), which due to it’s consistency produces a partially translucent effect. I then re-applied Flesh on top of the head, cheeks and nose.

I followed up with Agrax Earthshade wash (done at Step five: Brown wash).

Finally I highlighted with Games Workshop Dwarf Flesh. I also blended some of the Dwarf Flesh over wash made stains on top of the head.

Painting eyes is a topic on it’s own and I’m not trying to write a book here, so I used a simple method of a single white line followed by a black dot in the middle. Any necessary corrections can be done to your heart’s content by painting over and over till good results are produced.

Step eight: Backpack & Holsters

I started with a strong layer of Vallejo Charred Brown (air), ensuring not to leave a mess on top of any previous layer around the backpack.

I then flatbrushed Vallejo Beasty Brown over Charred Brown. No thinning, just paint straight from a bottle and onto a palette before application.

I used Games Workshop Karak Stone for gritty highlights plus painted a blanket strapped at the bottom of the backpack.

I then switched to Vallejo Panzer Dark Grey (air) and re-painted all the buckles grey.

Agrax Earthshade wash followed (done at Step five: Brown wash).

Finally I applied a highlight of Games Workshop Karak Stone onto the edges and middle areas.

Step nine: Mask Visor

I tried to keep this one extra simple. Started with a gritty, messy layer of Games Workshop Pallid Wych Flesh. No need to be overly precise, nor smooth. The more irregular, diverse the visor looks now, the better the end result.

I then applied slightly thinned down Vallejo Hot Orange (air). Once dry I applied another layer of the same stuff. Done.

Step ten: Teddy Bear

This one is such a cool detail. I decided to go purple/pink to make it stand out. I started with a solid layer of Vallejo Royal Purple.

I then applied Games Workshop Agrax Earthshade wash (done at Step five: Brown wash).

Once wash dried, I highlighted most exposed areas of the bear with Vallejo Warlord Purple.

I then used Vallejo Squid Pink for final highlight, applying dots and lines on top of most exposed areas.

To bring all layers together I applied a strong layer of Army Painter Purple Tone Ink.

Step eleven: Yellow Kneepad

Once again I decided for a feature to stand out. I started with a strong, precise layer of Vallejo Heavy Goldbrown.

I then applied an irregular highlight of Vallejo Pale Yellow.

Finally I washed it with Army Painter Soft Tone Ink, which brought both layers together and made the knee pad look darker and used thoroughly.

Step twelve: Basing

Time to finish the paint job with a proper looking base. For this purpose I decided to go with something easy to follow. One texture, one highlight and one tuft type for extra detail. I started with a large flat brush, applying a thick layer of AK Interactive Dark Earth texture. You can switch to any dark texture like for example Games Workshop Stirland Mud. I just prefer AK’s one because I find it easier to apply.

Once dry I drybrushed Dark Earth with Games Workshop Karak Stone.

Finally I glued an Army Painter Wasteland Tuft and re-painted base’s edge black afterwards.

I hope you find this tutorial interesting. Be sure to let me know your thoughts in the comments below or via Facebook.or Instagram. I would also appreciate if you considered sharing this content with your friends, who might find it useful. Finally if you are looking for a professional miniatures painting service be sure to contact me with this contact form. I always reply within 24 hours, after which please check out your spam folder.


Also be sure to check out Orzol Studio and their awesome Kickstarter: Post-apo Survivors.

Scarhandpainting

Tutorial: Painting Blood Bowl Bogenhafen Barons

Welcome to Painting Blood Bowl Bogenhafen Barons tutorial. Here I will present to you a Step-by-step of an easy and fast painting process for Games Workshop Bogenhafen Barons as can be seen in Gallery: Bogenhafen Barons.

Before we start, some notes:

  • This tutorial require airbrush.
  • You can use any paints, not just the ones I recommend. You can use this chart to compare paints between different brands.
  • Please note pictures present a huge miniature under strong light that might result in a feel of messy and clumsy paint job.
  • Pictures names don’t match steps in this tutorial. This is because I re-used pictures made for an Instagram tutorial. Sorry if this causes confussion.
  • As usual, please take note that what works for me might not necessarily work for you.

Step one: Undercoat

I started with a thorough layer of Games Workshop Chaos Black spray. This is a standard procedure for me. Chaos Black spray is my go to choice when it comes to undercoat. 

Step two: Cream

I started by airbrushing Vallejo Bonewhite (air) all over feathers and clothes of the miniature, not caring if I mess up everything around. Paint was applied straight out of bottle, no dilution. I then moved to GW Pale Wych Flesh and
Flatbrushed it over previous layer. This layer was meant to build volume of paint and just a bit of highlight for the color, so that further ahead Wash could do a better job.

Step three: Grey

I applied Vallejo Air Panzer Dark Grey (air) manually, with natural dilution (air series). This paint is easy to control which helped me keep the layer precise. The color wasn’t strong but this layer didn’t had to. It was meant to prepare a background for future highlights of dark black-to-brown elements. Next I used slightly diluted Vallejo Glacier Blue and flatbrushed it over previous layer. Finally I applied few highlights with GW Pale Wych Flesh.

Step four: Skin

I begun painting skin with Vallejo Tan by applying a thin layer and concentrating on filling recesses. I added another thin layer on large flat areas to provide a solid color. Next I switched to GW Dwarf Flesh covered previous layer using flatbrush technique. Final highlights were made with Vallejo Flesh (air). I used the paint straight out of the bottle and applied it on the edges and on top of flat areas.

Step five: Browns

I took on Browns by manually applying Vallejo Dark Fleshtone (air) onto everything to-be-brown. Natural air series dilution allowed me to control the paint and avoid messing up other layers. I then switched to GW Karak Stone and Flayed One Flesh for classic highlights. Just few lines and dots on the edges and in center areas.

Step six: Metal

I started metal with GW Warplock Bronze, applying a thinned down layer on top of armor pieces. I then moved to P3 Molten Bronze for flatbrushed highlights. Finally I applied few highlights with AP Shining Silver.

Step seven: Violet

I applied a layer of Vallejo Violet on chosen parts of clothes and decorations. This was the last layer before wash so I ensured it didn’t leave a mess on top of previous elements. At this point of the paint job, anything could still be corrected with minimum effort, and I done so accordingly.

Step eight: Wash

This is where magic always happens. I applied a wet layer of AP Strong Tone Ink mixed with a tiny bit of Matt Varnish, onto entire miniature. I then ensured to remove any excess paint, from where detail got completely covered by pigmentation, with a clean brush.

Step nine: Highlights

Once wash dried up, I applied highlights of GW Pale Wych Flesh. Edge highlights, points of focus and lines in the middle areas for everything not metal or skin. I also applied a strongly thinned down layer of Pale Wych Flesh on top of Purple clothes creating a somehow mist-like effect.

Step ten: Purple

I then got back to violet (now more of a purple) and blended a layer of Vallejo Warlord Purple (air) on top of it. Air series does not require any thinning, but I added a bit of medium to leave texture difference visible underneath. With a strong and vibrant color I moved to Vallejo Pale Flesh for both an edge highlight and some random lines. I used this opportunity to add few dots and lines on top of skin, thus providing a final highlight.

Step eleven: Belts

To make the belt stand out I applied Vallejo Panzer Dark Grey (air) on top and highlighted with Vallejo Ghost Grey. 

Step twelve: Final touches

After painting eyes and correcting small mistakes I finally based the miniature. I used AK Interactive Dark Earth for texture and drybrushed GW Karak Stone all over it. I then added a gentle drybrush of GW Flayed One Flesh to finally airbrush a straight line of pure white. To add some extra features I glued Gamers Grass 2mm Tiny Dry Tufts. Job complete.

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