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Tag Archives: Bases

Tutorial: Basing Miniatures

In this step-by-step tutorial I’m going to show you how to base miniatures.

Basing miniatures is an overall easy thing, still every now and then I stumble upon hobbyists asking on how to properly do it. Let’s start the answer with: “There’s no one proper way, but there are certainly plenty of bad ways to base miniatures.” A quick example of a “bad way” would be if you glued irregular sand on top of a base and tried to glue a miniature on top of it with cyanoacrylate glue. Glue would go on a rampage all over the sand while it’ll not hold the miniature in place due to insufficient area of contact. Another example of a “bad way” would be gluing a miniature on top of a painted base without a pin resulting with miniature being glued to paint rather than the base. This can only end badly for the miniature and your paint job. Ok, so what are the “proper ways”? Here’s three major techniques I use:

No Pin:

Some miniatures seem stable and have a large, flat area at the bottom be it giant feet, or an underside of a robe. In this case I usually go with with no pin at all and trust in the vast area of contact to keep the miniature in place.
Here’s how I go about it:

  • I start by removing the rail from under the miniature.
  • I then ensure the contact area on both the miniature and the base is flat and fit one another.
  • I apply Super Glue.
  • I glue the miniature on top of the base and use Magic Super Glue Activator to cement the glue before it spills from under the miniature.

Pinned:

I use this method in case of wobbly miniatures with small area of contact that for some reason don’t have the rail. Such miniatures require to be pinned to the base to ensure their safety and durability. Note that pinning requires additional tools as well as proper pins. Alongside a trusted hand driller you can also purchase original hobby pins, but these are expensive. Depending on how thick is the miniature I use either paperclips or a thin steel wire.

The steps I undertake to pin a miniature:

  • I ensure the contact area on both the miniature and the base is flat and fit one another.
  • I drill a tiny hole in the miniature’s area of contact.
  • I glue the pin into the hole with Super Glue then cut off the extent of the pin, leaving just few mm.
  • I drill another hole in the base, using the miniature to ensure it fits the base.
  • I apply Super Glue to area of contact.
  • I glue the miniature on top of the base.

Natural Pin:

This is my favorite method. I believe that a natural part of the miniature is better at holding it in place rather than a smooth steel pin.
This is what I do:

  • I cut off most of the rail from underneath the miniature, leaving just a a piece or two in place.
  • I then ensure the area of contact on both the miniature and the base is flat and fit one another (except for the pieces I left deliberately).
  • I drill a large hole in the base, sometimes I even leave some loose space on top to “guide” the pin in.
  • I apply Super Glue to area of contact.
  • I glue the miniature on top of the base.

From all the other methods this one works the best for me. Plus it’s faster than normal pinning. Just remember, there’s no one proper method. If you feel like a miniature might use a pin – Just follow your guts on this and pin it. Better safe than sorry.

I might drop another article on basing miniatures in the future. Maybe some Painting Philosophy type with insight on why I paint my miniatures based and not separately. If you think it’s an interesting topic and/or if you liked this article – consider letting me know in the comments or at my Facebook profile… or even share if you think it’s worth it 😉

PS: Check this stuff out! It blown my mind! XD

Nazroth

Tutorial: Painting Jade Bases

Welcome to Painting Jade Bases tutorial. Here I will take you on a Step-by-step trip through the process of painting jade Sci-Fi bases the same way as seen at: Gallery: Aleph S.S.S.

Before we start, some notes:

* This one requires an Airbrush.
* What works for me might not necessarily work for you.
* I used Zen Terrain “Futura” base toppers.

I used:

  • Coal Black (P3),
  • Panzer Dark Grey (Val, air),
  • Turquoise (Val),
  • Light Livery Green (Val, air),
  • Pale Wych Flesh (GW),
  • Waywatcher Green (GW),

Let’s begin!

*  I started by airbrushing a thick layer of Vallejo Panzer Dark Grey.

*  I followed with a layer of P3 Coal Black, mixed with Flow Improover.

*  Next I applied a layers of Vallejo Turquoise, mixed with Flow Improover, but this time made sure to leave some spots of previous layer visible.

*  Using a regular brush I then highlighted all the edges with Vallejo Turquoise.

*  Next I partially higlighted the edges with Games Workshop Pale Wych Flesh.

*  Back to airbruush, I applied a layer of Vallejo Light Livery Green on top of all lower parts of the base.

*  I then washed all recess spots with Games Workshop Waywatcher Green, being careful not to leave stain outside the lower parts of the base.

*  Finally I painted side edges black. Job done.

That’s all! If you followd this tutorial and painted your own bases this way, be sure to leave a comment and drop me some pics via Facebook 😉

Cheers!

Nazroth

Review: Zen Terrain Base Toppers

Zen Terrain, a company from Poland, known for laser cut scenery and accessories. Zen Terrain’s offer is not vast but it certainly is very well thought through with many advanced and interesting designs. I first met with Zen Terrain back in 2014, when I started collecting Infinity the Game. What drove me to Zen Terrain’s Sci-Fi range was a certain elegant theme that all the products share. Among scenery and gaming accessories, there’s a certain group of items that I had an opportunity to work with, the Base Toppers, known also as ‘Base Overlays’. Below you will find my take on them.

INTRODUCTION

They come in all different types, thickness and even made out of different material. Zen Terrain base toppers offer consists of a wide variety of products including industrial, oriental , cybernetic, technical patterns and more. Below is just a sample. To fully grasp what Zen has to offer visit Bases section of Zen Terrain site.

QUALITY

I will start by admitting the truth: I am a quality freak, when it comes to miniatures, accessories, scenery, literally everything miniatures related. I have mentioned this before so for those of you who read my articles this shouldn’t be a surprise. That being said, I have compared Zen Terrain base toppers quality to products from couple other companies (EU and US based) and as far as hard paper/HDF/MDF goes Zen Terrain range is top tier quality. Zen definitely does not save on material, nor laser cutting time. Material is strong, does not stratify, is precisely cut.

As a side note: Zen also provides quality check and packs this stuff very well for transportation. No missing parts and/or damage during shipment ever occurred when I received my orders.

VISUALS

This one is off course super bias dictated. Zen Terrain aesthetics might or might not work for you. Personally I really like some of Zen’s base toppers a lot. I do strongly ‘feel’ aesthetics of some of them. Going through entire range I do not find any type, that I feel like “naah, I don’t want to work with these as a painter” about.

FUNCTIONALITY

Another important aspect I always look for is functionality. As a full time painter I try to make my life easier and prefer to avoid products that does not go well with that philosophy. Working with Zen Terrain toppers have some merits. For instance they do not require any preparation. Just glue them on top the bases and you’re ready to go. (They fit the bases perfectly by the way, unlike some other worse quality toppers I worked with).

One thing that I find to be a little inconvenience comes from material itself. Where metal, plastic and resin are rather easy to drill, I find hard paper and HDF/MDF to distort around the drill hole. This is not a game changer, just requires a bit more time and some tricks to ‘repair’ afterwards. Figured thing like this is worth a mention if you’re considering laser cut toppers.

Zen Terrain base toppers work very well with paint. Have went through more than 200 of them, from among couple different types, in recent years. Never encountered any uncommon behavior or issues.

PRICE

The final aspect: Price. Pricing looks similar to other companies. For 5 25mm base toppers you will pay about 3,3€ so a bit less than Customeeple 3,95€, but also a bit more than Micro Art’s 2,56€ (these come in packs of 12 for 6,15€ only). Comparing to products from other companies (not only Sci-Fi themed) I would say Zen has a mid-tier price range. Personally I find this price to be well balanced with quality.

SUMMARY 10/10

To wrap things up, if you have no experience with Zen Terrain’s base toppers and consider using toppers in the future, I totally recommend going for Zen’s stuff. The range is there, full of interesting designs. Quality is top, price is good. They are easy to work with and look really nice once properly painted. When it comes to MDF/HDF/hard paper toppers, taking into account material properties I would give Zen Terrain’s stuff 9,5/10 rounding up to 10/10 and that’s on a scale where 10 is awesome, 8 is good, 6 is ok, 5 is mediocre, 3 is bad and I don’t want to even mention 1. I try to not be biased on this, even tho I know the man behind Zen Terrain personally. Allow me to finish up with this line: I seriously enjoy working with Zen Terrain base toppers and how they turn out, every time.

Where to purchase? Zen Terrain has it’s official webstore. I invite you to take a peek.

Nazroth

TUTORIAL: MODELLING LUSH BASES

In this easy, step-by-step tutorial I’m going to show you how to create a Lush Base. I designed these bases to fit Infinity the Game Tohaa ‘tactical rocks’ – you can see how it turned out at Infinity TOHAA ‘Witness Me!’ gallery.

I USED:

  • Super Glue,
  • Basing Glue,
  • Stirland Battlemire (GW texture paint),
  • Paint Forge Tufts,
  • Random Tufts,
  • Dried out Grape branch,

*  I started by separating Grape mounts from the dried out Grape branch. Being rather soft, their topf have been removed to improove durability and shape.

*  I then applied a drop of basing glue onto the base, followed up shortly by another drop - this time super glue.

*  Before mixed glue drop was able to dry out I've planted Grape mount on top of it, creating strange looking plant.

*  Once glue dried up I've painted the bases following choosen colour scheme (see below). I then added some texture on top of them with Stirland Battlemire texture paint.

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*  Last step was to apply regular tufts. I used some noname tufts in large numbers filling most of the flat areas. Job done.

BONUS COLOUR RECIPE:

:

Black Undercoat,

Stirland Battlemire (GW), texture

Karak Stone (GW), stones & plants

Flayed One Flesh (GW), flatbrush stones & plants

Mix Strong Tone Ink (AP) 1:1 Soft Tone Ink (AP), wash

Nazroth

TUTORIAL: MODELLING LAVA BASES

In this easy, step-by-step tutorial I’m going to show you how to create and paint a Lava Bases. I used these bases for Infinity the Game Combined Army – you can see how it turned out at Infinity COMBINED ARMY ‘Witness Me!’ gallery.

I USED:

  • Super Glue,
  • Basing Glue,
  • Cork,
  • Shoe moist absorbers**

**Where I’m from there’s a small paper bag filled with moist absorbsion balls in every shoe box. If you can’t get that, just use some grains or make small balls out of green stuff or even modeling clay.

*  I started by breaking a piece of Cork into smaller bitz.

*  I then applied Super Glue over the bases in a random pattern. No need to be precise here.

*  Pieces of Cork followed to form 'volcanic rocks' and future spots for the miniatures to be mounted on.

*  Once Super Glue dried out I covered entire base with Basing Glue.

*  I then dropped tiny balls (shoe moist absorbers) oon top of the Basing Glue, between 'volcanic rocks' to create an effect boiling lava bubbles.

*  Next I applied Basing Glue over the bubbles.

BONUS PAINTING STEP-BY-STEP:

:

*  Black Undercoat.

*  Mahogany (Val) airbrushed all over the base.

*  Gorthror Brown (GW) drybrush over the Rocks.

*  Gory Red (Val) airbrushed over Lava.

*  Scrofulous Brown (Val) airbrushed over Lava.

*  Scrofulous Brown (Val) + White airbrushed over Lava.

*  Black spots added around Rocks

*  Scrofulous Brown (Val) airbrushed over Black spots.

*  Lamenters Yellow (GW) airbrushed over Lava.

*  Hot Orange (Val) spots airbrushed over Black spots, White airbrushed over bubbles.

*  Scrofulous Brown (Val) + Black, then pure Black glaze applied oved the Rocks.

*  Gloss Varnish applied over Lava.

 

 

 

Nazroth

TUTORIAL: MODELLING COBBLESTONE BASES

In this easy, step-by-step tutorial I’m going to show you how to create a Cobblestone Base in a what is probably the fastest and simplest way ever.

I USED:

  • Wallpaper*,
  • Basing Glue,
  • Flat (used up) Brush,
  • Hobby Knife,

*Just find a suitable one at a local builder’s store.

1  I started by covering entire base with Basing Glue.

2  I then cut off a piece of the wallpaper to be slightly larger then the base itself.

3  Next I glued the piece onto the base, turned the base upside down and cut off the excess of the wallpaper with a Hobby Knife.

4  Last step was to smoother the edges with a slightly moisted fingertip.

Now you see how insanely fast and easy this was. For the purpose of this tutorial I made just this simple base, but once you get your hands on a proper wallpaper, options are limitless. You can use it to texturize bases and terrain, add more detail or even mix different types of texture.

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Nazroth

TUTORIAL: MODELLING OVERGROWN BASES

Today I’m going to reveal one of my dearest secrets: how Super Glue and Basing Glue can be used to make some fantastic, crazy, awesome stuff! I have invented it by accident when I was a kid, used it since and love it for both simplicity and awesome texture effect. In this easy, step-by-step tutorial I will show you how to produce your own Overgrown Bases!

I USED:

  • Super Glue,
  • Basing Glue,
  • Birch-tree seeds*
  • Bitz of dried out grapes**
  • Random small balls***

*I purchased a huge pack of these for approximately 1€,

**Once you eat up all the goodie goodie grapes, you have like a bunch of wooden leftovers. Once dried out these are awesome bor basing miniatures.

***I use either Air Soft Gun ammuniton, or for smaller calliber moist absorber balls obtainable with every new pair of shoes. Just ask your gf to dig out one of her shoeboxes, there should be a small paper bag filled with tiny, translucent balls in it.

1  I started by applying basing glue all over the base. No need to make it smooth, just enough not to leave any empty spaces.

2  I then dropped some of the tiny balls and Birch-tree seeds over the wet glue.

3  Here's where MAGIC begun. I covered entire base with Super Glue and watched as it was warped before my eyes in a matter of merely seconds.

4  Before it dried out I added some pieces of dry grape vines to make it look like some strange, alien mushrooms, or plants. I then covered additional stuff with more Super Glue to harden it.

5  Last step was to leave entire thing to dry out. Usually it takes around five minutes for a base to get dry, but it might take a bit longer, depending on how much basing glue is used.

6  The final step was to undercoat dried out base with Chaos Black spray... then do a quick paint job with random colours.

Now seriously – tell my that’s not an awesome texture effect XD This is like ultra-fast, mega-cool way of using two glues to create utter chaos on any surface. Chaos mutations, warped stuff, Zerg creep, alien planet foliage, jungle floor, faerie glade, name it – then glue+glue it 😉

Do not hesitate to let me know and send some pictures via FACEBOOK if you ever use the tutorial. I will be happy to see how it turned out 😉

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Nazroth

TUTORIAL: MODELLING CAVE BASES

In this easy, step-by-step tutorial I’m going to show you how to create a Cave Base.

I USED:

  • Super Glue,
  • Basing Glue,
  • Toothpicks and nail sticks*
  • Small gravel stones**
  • Games Workshop Texture Paints,

*Ask your GF if you don’t know where to obtain the latter.

**Search in IKEA or any home/garden store. A lifetime stockpile of these is less than 5€.

 

1  I started by cutting off the tips of both toothpicks and nail sticks. These would do for fine stalagmites later on.

2  I then applied couple of drops of basing glue onto the base. Before it dried out I applied Super Glue on it and mounted stalagmites, tip upwards, on the mix.

3  Next I covered entire stalagmites with basing glue and left it to dry. The excess glue, moved by the power of gravity, was drawn downwards, where it rested around the base of the stalagmites, making them look smooth and natural.

4  Using the previous technique I applied some basing glue in few spots and then Super Glue'ed some gravel over it. You can actually glue any type of stuff with this - like skulls, some pieces of armour etc.

5  I then covered antire surface, except for any fillers, with Games Workshop's texture paints. I used a mix of Agrellan Earth and Agrellan Badland for this tutorial, but actually any of the range will do - as long as you would like to undercoat the base afterwards.

6  The final step was to undercoat dried out base with Chaos Black spray...

Now, what’s left is just to paint the bases with your preferable colour scheme. I chose to go red/copper style similar to ‘the Wave’ and watered some spots with clear resin, but the number of potential colour schemes is unlimited.

If you ever use the tutorial – be sure to let me know and send some pictures via FACEBOOK. I will be happy to see how it turned out 😉

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Nazroth

TUTORIAL: CONCRETE BASES part 1: Modelling

Ever wanted to make some cool looking bases for your Infinity models? Here’s a tutorial of how to do it 🙂

I USED:

*Round bases,
*Plastticard,
*Some SF bitz,
*Modelling Knife, File, Sculpting Tool and glue,

Instead of SF bitz you can use literally anything including toothpick, brass mesh, pieces of computer, irregular pieces of plastic etc.

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1  Attach some bitz onto the bases using Super glue. You don't have to fit these bitz ideally, just place them so that they create a nice composition with the rest of the base.

p2

2  Now glue some small pieces of plasticard around the bitz. Try not to use too much glue as it may spill onto the edge of the base. If need be you may want to prepare plastticard pieces to ideally fit around bitz you've used.

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3  Use sharp modelling knife to delicatelly cut off all the excessive plasticard. Use the edge of the base to guide the knife's cutting edge.

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4  Here's how the effect of your work should look like:

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5  It is a good idea to further smooth the edges using knife so they will be easier to file later on.

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6  Now it is time to get rid of protruding bitz. The quickest way to do it is to use plastic cutters.

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7  Next step is to file the edges of both plastic bitz and plasticard.

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8  The work is almost at an end. The bases will look much better with some facture added to them. Use a sculpting tool or other similar object to carve some futuristic straight lines and bolt holes.

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9  You can easily add some battle damage. Just embed the modelling knife in the edge of the base and then pull it up to rend some plasticard chunks out of it.

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That is all – you’ve just made a SF, battle damaged base for yourself.

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End Result:

Nomad Moran 1

Be sure to check out another part of this tutorial at: CONCRETE BASES TUTORIAL part 2: Painting

Nazroth
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