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MODELLING TUTORIALS

Tutorial: Kings of War Armada Islands

Welcome to Kings of War Armada Islands tutorial. Here I will take you on a Step-by-step trip through the process of creating and painting DiY islands scenery for Mantic Games Kings of War Armada as presented in the picture below.

Before we start, some notes:

  • This one requires airbrush.
  • I put aside realism and focused on simplicity and rule of cool instead.
  • As usual, please take note that what works for me might not necessarily work for you.

Modelling:

Playing a friendly game on a set of fully painted and modeled scenery is  always a great experience. In my opinion there’s nothing better than to let yourself go “full immersion mode” during a game of plastic dudesmen, or in this case – resin boats. That’s why I decided to create a set of appropriate scenery and use this opportunity to let you in on some of my hobby secrets.

When planning the set and how to make it my priorities were ease of build (and copy), durability, stability and obviously cool looks! Thus choice of material being mostly PCV and stones. PCV sheets are easy to work with, stay flat and are very glue friendly, whereas stones provide cheap and easy to use terrain features that will add weight and improve stability of the scenery pieces. With that in mind – let’s begin!

Step one: Basic shapes

I started by cutting a island’s base out of 1mm thick PCV sheet with a pair of scissors. I then smoothed the edges with a piece of sandpaper.
Next, using a hobby knife, I cut the island itself. This time I used 3mm thick PCV and cut the edges at a 30-45* angle, leaving approximately 1,5cm of the base all around the island. Once done I glued both pieces together, using Army Painter’s Super Glue.

Step two: Rocky features

I then applied PVA glue to some areas on the island, followed by AP’s Super Glue and finally Rocks – repositioned to look interesting. I also added some bitz, but I leave it up to you to decide if you want to do the same.

Step three: Wooden piers

Next I decided to add a bit of character with an old, damaged wooden pier jutting into the sea. I used a piece of MDF cut into a thin strip as a base for the pier, but you can really use anything – including 1mm thick PCV. Just cut a strip, glued tiny bit underneath, then glued it on top of the island and it’s base. Finally marked tiny holes along the sides of the pier and ‘superglued’ toothpicks in place, just to cut them off close to the pier’s level. Done.

Step four: Palm trees

At that point I didn’t wanted to waste good toothpicks and here’s where palm trees idea originates from. I gently squeezed the blunt tip of a toothpick with cutters and moved it around. I made this every two or so mm on the length of the toothpick. I then cut a piece off and gently bent it. With palm trees trunks ready to be added on top to the island, I just pushed a sharp tool into the PCV to create tiny holes and glued the trunks into it.

Step five: Textures

Final modelling step was to apply textures. First I filled gaps and surrounding areas between stones with AK Interactive Concrete from diorama series. I then covered rest of the island with Vallejo Desert Sand texture.

Painting:

Sandy beaches, rocky coast and vibrant blue water around. With such theme in mind I started the paint job. 

Basics:

First step was to undercoat the islands black and then airbrush white all over it to create a nice base for both water and sand colors. 

Sand:

Sand was painted using airbrushed Vallejo Desert Sand, followed by Light Brown and finally drybrushed with Ice Yellow.

Rocks:

Rocks followed with a similarly easy recipe being airbrushed Vallejo Dark Panzer Grey, Cold Grey, Pale Grey Blue and drybrushed Ghost Grey.

Water:

Here’s the tricky one. I decided to go hard with stencil airbrushed Vallejo Light Sea Blue, Magic Blue and spots of airbrushed Army Painted Blue Ink. I then sealed it with airbrushed Gloss Varnish.

Final touches:

I added some final touches by manually applied AK Interactive effects creating waves and water foam. To add a nice color diversity on top of the island I also applied Gamers Grass Dry Green and Swamp tufts. Pal trees got finished with Shady Green tufts from Paint Forge.

First two islands discovered, I’m ready to head up for the unknown waters. More scenery to come, following the same template. If you stick a while at my blog you’re bound to see more islands and other scenery types, including deadly rocks and shipwrecks. Be sure to visit Scarhandpainting next time you hit a port! Ahoy!

Nazroth

Tutorial: Modelling Rocky Bases with Gamers Grass

Welcome to Rocky Bases tutorial. Here I will take you on a Step-by-step trip through the process of creating and painting Rocky Bases as presented in the picture below. This adventure is possible thanks to generosity of Gamers Grass and their easy to use, fantastic products.

Before we start, some notes:

  • This one does not requires airbrush.
  • To better demonstrate the technique used I used standard 55mm and 25mm round bases.
  • As usual, please take note that what works for me might not necessarily work for you.

Modelling:

As mentioned in previous Tutorial, when making bases, I usually aim for fast, simple, yet effective solutions. It is important to pick a basing method that is easy to copy onto large quantities of miniatures or coming back to a project. This is why I consider Gamers Grass Basing Bits a perfect solution. Nicely textured, ready to use straight out of the box – glue them on, add some texture around – you’re ready to paint. All that being said – for this particular base type I choose Gamers Grass “Rocks” basing bits.

Step one: Applying basing bits

I started by applying glue onto the base and gluing few basing bits on top.

Step two: Applying texture

I then applied texture with Games Workshop Stirland Mud.

At this point entire “Modelling” part is done. If  it seem fast it’s because it really is. Just two steps and you’re ready to paint!

Painting:

I choose to paint these Rocky bases in a classic Bron plus Grey style. Assuming these are meant to be used for a large collection, I want to keep things simple. Would be perfect to close in about three layers per color, with a single type of tufts on top. Just your everyday nice looking, coherent bases. Here’s how I went about it…

Step two: Undercoat

I applied a black undercoat.

Step two: Main color

I then painted entire base with Vallejo Charred Brown. Once dry I drybrushed Games Workshop Calthan Brown on top.

Step two: Secondary color

For rocks I went with Vallejo Panzer Dark Grey, followed by a drybrush of Games Workshop Fortress Grey.

Step tree: Highlights

Final highlight was done with a drybrush of Games Workshop Karak Stone for brown and a drybrush of Vallejo Ghost Grey for rocks.

Step tree: Tufts

Finally I applied Gamers Grass Swamp Wild Tufts.


And with that the job was done! Fast and easy – as all bases should be. I hope this was a pleasant tutorial and that you saw how simple the process is. If you want to learn more about Gamers Grass products – here’s my review:

Tutorial: Temple Bases with Gamers Grass

Nazroth

Tutorial: Modelling Temple Bases with Gamers Grass

Welcome to Temple Bases tutorial. Here I will take you on a Step-by-step trip through the process of creating and painting Temple Bases as presented in the picture below. This adventure is possible thanks to generosity of Gamers Grass and their easy to use, fantastic products.

Before we start, some notes:

  • This one requires airbrush.
  • To better demonstrate the technique used I used standard 55mm and 25mm round bases.
  • As usual, please take note that what works for me might not necessarily work for you.

Modelling:

In my opinion base is supposed to complement a miniature, not steal the spotlight. For this reason, when making bases, I usually aim for fast, simple, yet effective solutions. Important thing to note when deciding on what to use for your bases is to pick a method that is easy to copy. This is why I consider Gamers Grass Basing Bits a perfect solution. Nicely textured, ready to use straight out of the box – glue them on, add some texture around – you’re ready to paint. All that being said – for this particular base type I choose Gamers Grass “Temple” basing bits.

Step one: Applying basing bits

I started by applying glue onto the base and gluing few basing bits on top.

Step two: Applying texture

I then applied texture with Games Workshop Stirland Mud.

At this point entire “Modelling” part is done. If  it seem fast it’s because it really is. Just two steps and you’re ready to paint!

Painting:

I choose to paint these Temple bases in a bit of a Desert’ish style. Let’s say these are meant to be used for a large army. I want to keep things simple, best if within three layers per color, crowned with a single type of tufts. Nothing fancy, just nice looking, coherent bases. Here’s how I went about it…

Step one: Undercoat

I applied a black undercoat. This is my usual start for everything 😛

Step two: Main color

I then airbrushed Vallejo Desert Yellow over entire base. Once dry I applied Vallejo European Dust Wash.

Step two: Secondary color

For ruins I choose Vallejo Cold Grey, followed by a wash of water thinned Vallejo Dark Panzer Grey.

Step tree: Highlights

I then highlighted both colors with a soft drybrush of Games Workshop Flayed One Flesh. I also applied some highlights with the same color on the edges of ruins – just a bit to make them pop.

Step tree: Tufts

Finally I applied Gamers Grass Burned Wild Tufts.


Job done! There’s some poetry in both starting and finishing a base using products from the same company 😛 Either way – I hope this was a pleasant tutorial and that you saw how simple the process is. If you want to learn more about Gamers Grass products – here’s my review:

Tutorial: Temple Bases with Gamers Grass

Nazroth

Tutorial: Modelling Cityfight Bases

In this step-by-step tutorial I’m going to show you how to create Cityfight bases same way I did for Gallery: Tau Sa’Cea.

MODELLING:

I used:

  • PVA glue
  • Super glue,
  • Hobby knife,
  • Gravel,
  • Toothpicks,
  • Plasticard,
  • Lollipop sticks,
  • Paper tube,
  • Plastic sprues,

Step one: Special detail

Using a hobby knife I cut all the sticks, sprues, toothpicks, plasticard and tube into small pieces. I made sure to cut one side of each piece at an angle, to better position each piece on the base. I then glued random pieces on top of a base using Super glue.

Step two: Gravel

I applied PVA glue around previously glued pieces. I then applied Super glue on top of it and, before super glue hardened, covered entire thing with thick sand mixed with hobby gravel.

Step three: Texture

I then textured rest of the base using Games Workshop Astrogranite and Astrogranite Debris paints.

PAINTING:

I started with Black Undercoat, then airbrushed a layer of Vallejo Cold Grey, followed short by Vallejo Stonewall Grey. I then washed everything black using Army Painter Dark Tone Ink and once it dried I drybrushed entire base with Games Workshop Administratum Grey.

For metal debris elements I used a mix of Games Workshop Warplock Bronze and Army Painter Gun Metal, followed by a highlight of Army Painter Shining Silver. I then washed all the pieces brown with Army Painter Strong Tone Ink.

For additional depth and effects I blended in some watered Vallejo Earth. Next I washed all metal debris with a mix of Vallejo Dark Red Ochre Pigment and Army Painter Soft Tone Ink. Lastly I drybrushed grey areas with Vallejo Ghost Grey.

Edges repainted black and job done!

You like this article? Don’t be a stranger! Let me know what you think in the comments below or at my Facebook profile! Cheers!

Nazroth

Tutorial: DIY Gravestones “Pimp your Mortician’s I”

In this step-by-step tutorial I’m going to show you how to create gravestones. Please treat this article more like an inspiration, rather than tutorial.

I recently started collecting Guildball and decided to create graveyard themed bases for my Mortician’s. In the miniatures world gravestones are a rare bitz to come across. Sure there are some graveyard themed miniatures sets but getting them just for the sake of gravestones seem like a ludicrous idea – at least for me. Cuz why not just make your own? It is pretty simple you know…

I USED:

  • 2mm Plasticard,
  • Super Glue,
  • Hobby knife,
  • Stone,
  • Decorative beads, gears and keys,

BRONZE CHARMS:

Before we get into it, let’s talk all the charms, decorative beads and bronze gears. Ever heard of Aliexpress? Just search for “decorative charms bronze” and prepare yourself for a mind blowing experience – cause miniatures modelling would never be the same from now on…

Step one: Cutting plasticard

Using a hobby knife I cut 2mm plasticard into pieces of more or less gravestone size and shape.

Step two: Applying texture

I then “textured” each gravestone with a rock. I know how it sounds, but yeah – I simply rock’n’rolled on top of the plasticard to create an uneven texture.

Step three: Detail

With basic gravestones done I added some detail. I glued plasticard and some of the bronze charms on top and on the sides.
Good to know: Bronze charms are easy to work with. They can be broken into smaller pieces with tweezers and just a bit of force.

Well… that’s all. Job done! That was easy, wasn’t it? Plus it costed barely couple bucks for an entire graveyard worth of material! Not that I need as much 😛

Now just waiting for all the Mortician’s to show up. Can’t wait to get these painted!

You find this article helpful? Don’t be a stranger and drop me a comment below!

Nazroth

Tutorial: DIY Gaslands Desert Scenery

In this easy, step-by-step tutorial I’m going to show you how to create a Desert Scenery as could be found in “Gallery: Gaslands”.

I USED:

  • Basing Glue,
  • Super Glue,
  • Hobby knife,
  • Lighter,
  • Sheet of Cork,
  • Plaster (Gypsum),
  • Sheet of 3mm thick Plasticard (or styrofoam),
  • Foamed PCV,
  • Sand,
  • Random trash,

*  I started by cutting foamed PCV (or styrofoam) into basic rocky blocks.

*  I then used lighter to gently heat blocks on the sides, avoiding heating up top and bottom surfaces.

*  Next, using a hobby knife, I cut bases from 3mm thick plasticard.

*  I then glued rocky blocks on top of the bases with basing (PVA) glue. I also glued some blocks on top of one another for the scenery to look more diverse and interresting.

*  Next I crumbled a sheet of cork into small pieces and glued them on top of the blocks with basing glue, sanding them before glue dried out to fill the gaps inbetween separate cork pieces.

*  I then used plaster (gypsum) to build a gentle transition between bases and blocks.

*  A time has come for me to add some detail. Not much, just some texture to bring more life to the wasteland. I cut pieces of plasticard and used toothpicks, MDF leftovers and a toy car to create ragtag barricades and post-apo racing signs.

*  Lastly, with a regular brush, I applied basing glue then sanded all the plaster, sides of the bases and some areas around cork pieces on top of the blocks.

Couple of hours later I have painted this stuff and added some tuftsthe end result looks like this:

Nazroth

Tutorial: Modelling Toxic Sludge Bases

In this easy, step-by-step tutorial I’m going to show you how to create a Toxic Sludge Base. I designed these bases for Warhammer 40,000 Death Guuard Plague Marines.

I USED:

  • Basing Glue,
  • Shoe moist absorbers**
  • Vallejo Interior Green,
  • Vallejo Duuck Egg Green,
  • Vallejo Light Livery Green,

**Where I’m from there’s a small paper bag filled with moist absorbsion balls in every shoe box. If you can’t get that, just use some grains or make small balls out of green stuff or modeling clay.

*  I started by covering entire base with a layer of basing glue.

*  I then put couple of tiny balls onto the base, creating 'buubbles' and let it all dry.

*  Once dry, I covered are around the bubbles with another layer of basing glue.

*  I let it all dry for about an hour, then undercoated entire base black.

*  I then airbrushed a layer of Vallejo Interior Green over entire base.

*  Next I airbrushed a layer of Duck Egg Green concentrating on bubbles and surrounding areas.

*  Last thing to do was to airbrush two layers of Light Livery Green over entire bases and paint the sides black.

 

Nazroth

Tutorial: Modelling Seed-Embryo

In this easy, step-by-step tutorial I’m going to show you how to create a Seed-Embryo marker, same as from Infinity SHASVASTII lvl 5 ‘Witness Me!’ gallery.

I USED:

  • Super Glue,
  • Basing Glue,
  • Office Clips,
  • Toothpicks,
  • Small balls (airsoft gun ammo)
  • Hobby Cutters & Hobby Tweezers,

*  I started by straightening two office clips, leaving both ends curved.

*  I then wraped them around one another and once done, cut a piece with hobby cutters.

*  Next I applied a drop of basing glue, followed by a drop of super glue onto a base.

*  Then I glued wraped up office clip piece on top of the super glue spot.

*  Airsoft gun ammo ball followed, on top of the office clip piece. First a drop of super glue, then basing glue, then I slightly dipped the ball in super glue and glued it on.

*  Lastly I modelled three growth pieces on top of the ball, applying a small dose of basing glue with a tootpick, then covering it with super glue.

And that’s it! The Seed-Embryo markers ready in few minutes. Just make sure you let them dry before painting – I recommend about 4 hours for super glue – basing glue mix to fully dry out and produce awesome texture.


Do you like this tutorial? Have you made your own Seed-Embryo markers? Be sure to let me know in the commets below!

Nazroth

Tutorial: Modelling Lush Bases

In this easy, step-by-step tutorial I’m going to show you how to create a Lush Base. I designed these bases to fit Infinity the Game Tohaa ‘tactical rocks’ – you can see how it turned out at Infinity TOHAA ‘Witness Me!’ gallery.

I USED:

  • Super Glue,
  • Basing Glue,
  • Stirland Battlemire (GW texture paint),
  • Paint Forge Tufts,
  • Random Tufts,
  • Dried out Grape branch,

*  I started by separating Grape mounts from the dried out Grape branch. Being rather soft, their topf have been removed to improove durability and shape.

*  I then applied a drop of basing glue onto the base, followed up shortly by another drop - this time super glue.

*  Before mixed glue drop was able to dry out I've planted Grape mount on top of it, creating strange looking plant.

*  Once glue dried up I've painted the bases following choosen colour scheme (see below). I then added some texture on top of them with Stirland Battlemire texture paint.

*  orem ipsum dolor sit amet, Integer commodo tristiqu odio, aliquet ut. Maecenas sed justo imperdiet bibendum. Vivamus nec sapien imperdiet diam. Aliquam erat volutpat. Sed onsectetur suscipit nunc et rutrum. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet,volutpat. Sed onsectetur suscipit nunc et rutrum. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, volutpat.

*  Last step was to apply regular tufts. I used some noname tufts in large numbers filling most of the flat areas. Job done.

BONUS COLOUR RECIPE:

:

Black Undercoat,

Stirland Battlemire (GW), texture

Karak Stone (GW), stones & plants

Flayed One Flesh (GW), flatbrush stones & plants

Mix Strong Tone Ink (AP) 1:1 Soft Tone Ink (AP), wash

Nazroth

Tutorial: Modelling Lava Bases

In this easy, step-by-step tutorial I’m going to show you how to create and paint a Lava Bases. I used these bases for Infinity the Game Combined Army – you can see how it turned out at Infinity COMBINED ARMY ‘Witness Me!’ gallery.

I USED:

  • Super Glue,
  • Basing Glue,
  • Cork,
  • Shoe moist absorbers**

**Where I’m from there’s a small paper bag filled with moist absorbsion balls in every shoe box. If you can’t get that, just use some grains or make small balls out of green stuff or even modeling clay.

*  I started by breaking a piece of Cork into smaller bitz.

*  I then applied Super Glue over the bases in a random pattern. No need to be precise here.

*  Pieces of Cork followed to form 'volcanic rocks' and future spots for the miniatures to be mounted on.

*  Once Super Glue dried out I covered entire base with Basing Glue.

*  I then dropped tiny balls (shoe moist absorbers) oon top of the Basing Glue, between 'volcanic rocks' to create an effect boiling lava bubbles.

*  Next I applied Basing Glue over the bubbles.

BONUS PAINTING STEP-BY-STEP:

:

*  Black Undercoat.

*  Mahogany (Val) airbrushed all over the base.

*  Gorthror Brown (GW) drybrush over the Rocks.

*  Gory Red (Val) airbrushed over Lava.

*  Scrofulous Brown (Val) airbrushed over Lava.

*  Scrofulous Brown (Val) + White airbrushed over Lava.

*  Black spots added around Rocks

*  Scrofulous Brown (Val) airbrushed over Black spots.

*  Lamenters Yellow (GW) airbrushed over Lava.

*  Hot Orange (Val) spots airbrushed over Black spots, White airbrushed over bubbles.

*  Scrofulous Brown (Val) + Black, then pure Black glaze applied oved the Rocks.

*  Gloss Varnish applied over Lava.

 

 

 

Nazroth
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