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MODELLING TUTORIALS

Tutorial: Kings of War Armada Islands

Welcome to Kings of War Armada Islands tutorial. Here I will take you on a Step-by-step trip through the process of creating and painting DiY islands scenery for Mantic Games Kings of War Armada as presented in the picture below.

Before we start, some notes:

  • This one requires airbrush.
  • I put aside realism and focused on simplicity and rule of cool instead.
  • As usual, please take note that what works for me might not necessarily work for you.

Modelling:

Playing a friendly game on a set of fully painted and modeled scenery is  always a great experience. In my opinion there’s nothing better than to let yourself go “full immersion mode” during a game of plastic dudesmen, or in this case – resin boats. That’s why I decided to create a set of appropriate scenery and use this opportunity to let you in on some of my hobby secrets.

When planning the set and how to make it my priorities were ease of build (and copy), durability, stability and obviously cool looks! Thus choice of material being mostly PCV and stones. PCV sheets are easy to work with, stay flat and are very glue friendly, whereas stones provide cheap and easy to use terrain features that will add weight and improve stability of the scenery pieces. With that in mind – let’s begin!

Step one: Basic shapes

I started by cutting a island’s base out of 1mm thick PCV sheet with a pair of scissors. I then smoothed the edges with a piece of sandpaper.
Next, using a hobby knife, I cut the island itself. This time I used 3mm thick PCV and cut the edges at a 30-45* angle, leaving approximately 1,5cm of the base all around the island. Once done I glued both pieces together, using Army Painter’s Super Glue.

Step two: Rocky features

I then applied PVA glue to some areas on the island, followed by AP’s Super Glue and finally Rocks – repositioned to look interesting. I also added some bitz, but I leave it up to you to decide if you want to do the same.

Step three: Wooden piers

Next I decided to add a bit of character with an old, damaged wooden pier jutting into the sea. I used a piece of MDF cut into a thin strip as a base for the pier, but you can really use anything – including 1mm thick PCV. Just cut a strip, glued tiny bit underneath, then glued it on top of the island and it’s base. Finally marked tiny holes along the sides of the pier and ‘superglued’ toothpicks in place, just to cut them off close to the pier’s level. Done.

Step four: Palm trees

At that point I didn’t wanted to waste good toothpicks and here’s where palm trees idea originates from. I gently squeezed the blunt tip of a toothpick with cutters and moved it around. I made this every two or so mm on the length of the toothpick. I then cut a piece off and gently bent it. With palm trees trunks ready to be added on top to the island, I just pushed a sharp tool into the PCV to create tiny holes and glued the trunks into it.

Step five: Textures

Final modelling step was to apply textures. First I filled gaps and surrounding areas between stones with AK Interactive Concrete from diorama series. I then covered rest of the island with Vallejo Desert Sand texture.

Painting:

Sandy beaches, rocky coast and vibrant blue water around. With such theme in mind I started the paint job. 

Basics:

First step was to undercoat the islands black and then airbrush white all over it to create a nice base for both water and sand colors. 

Sand:

Sand was painted using airbrushed Vallejo Desert Sand, followed by Light Brown and finally drybrushed with Ice Yellow.

Rocks:

Rocks followed with a similarly easy recipe being airbrushed Vallejo Dark Panzer Grey, Cold Grey, Pale Grey Blue and drybrushed Ghost Grey.

Water:

Here’s the tricky one. I decided to go hard with stencil airbrushed Vallejo Light Sea Blue, Magic Blue and spots of airbrushed Army Painted Blue Ink. I then sealed it with airbrushed Gloss Varnish.

Final touches:

I added some final touches by manually applied AK Interactive effects creating waves and water foam. To add a nice color diversity on top of the island I also applied Gamers Grass Dry Green and Swamp tufts. Pal trees got finished with Shady Green tufts from Paint Forge.

First two islands discovered, I’m ready to head up for the unknown waters. More scenery to come, following the same template. If you stick a while at my blog you’re bound to see more islands and other scenery types, including deadly rocks and shipwrecks. Be sure to visit Scarhandpainting next time you hit a port! Ahoy!

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Tutorial: DIY Gravestones

In this step-by-step tutorial I’m going to show you how to create gravestones. Please treat this article more like an inspiration, rather than tutorial.

I recently started collecting Guildball and decided to create graveyard themed bases for my Mortician’s. In the miniatures world gravestones are a rare bitz to come across. Sure there are some graveyard themed miniatures sets but getting them just for the sake of gravestones seem like a ludicrous idea – at least for me. Cuz why not just make your own? It is pretty simple you know…

I USED:

  • 2mm Plasticard,
  • Super Glue,
  • Hobby knife,
  • Stone,
  • Decorative beads, gears and keys,

BRONZE CHARMS:

Before we get into it, let’s talk all the charms, decorative beads and bronze gears. Ever heard of Aliexpress? Just search for “decorative charms bronze” and prepare yourself for a mind blowing experience – cause miniatures modelling would never be the same from now on…

Step one: Cutting plasticard

Using a hobby knife I cut 2mm plasticard into pieces of more or less gravestone size and shape.

Step two: Applying texture

I then “textured” each gravestone with a rock. I know how it sounds, but yeah – I simply rock’n’rolled on top of the plasticard to create an uneven texture.

Step three: Detail

With basic gravestones done I added some detail. I glued plasticard and some of the bronze charms on top and on the sides.
Good to know: Bronze charms are easy to work with. They can be broken into smaller pieces with tweezers and just a bit of force.

Well… that’s all. Job done! That was easy, wasn’t it? Plus it costed barely couple bucks for an entire graveyard worth of material! Not that I need as much 😛

Now just waiting for all the Mortician’s to show up. Can’t wait to get these painted!

You find this article helpful? Don’t be a stranger and drop me a comment below!

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Tutorial: DIY Gaslands Desert Scenery

In this easy, step-by-step tutorial I’m going to show you how to create a Desert Scenery as could be found in “Gallery: Gaslands”.

I USED:

  • Basing Glue,
  • Super Glue,
  • Hobby knife,
  • Lighter,
  • Sheet of Cork,
  • Plaster (Gypsum),
  • Sheet of 3mm thick Plasticard (or styrofoam),
  • Foamed PCV,
  • Sand,
  • Random trash,

*  I started by cutting foamed PCV (or styrofoam) into basic rocky blocks.

*  I then used lighter to gently heat blocks on the sides, avoiding heating up top and bottom surfaces.

*  Next, using a hobby knife, I cut bases from 3mm thick plasticard.

*  I then glued rocky blocks on top of the bases with basing (PVA) glue. I also glued some blocks on top of one another for the scenery to look more diverse and interresting.

*  Next I crumbled a sheet of cork into small pieces and glued them on top of the blocks with basing glue, sanding them before glue dried out to fill the gaps inbetween separate cork pieces.

*  I then used plaster (gypsum) to build a gentle transition between bases and blocks.

*  A time has come for me to add some detail. Not much, just some texture to bring more life to the wasteland. I cut pieces of plasticard and used toothpicks, MDF leftovers and a toy car to create ragtag barricades and post-apo racing signs.

*  Lastly, with a regular brush, I applied basing glue then sanded all the plaster, sides of the bases and some areas around cork pieces on top of the blocks.

Couple of hours later I have painted this stuff and added some tuftsthe end result looks like this:

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Tutorial: Modelling Seed-Embryo

In this easy, step-by-step tutorial I’m going to show you how to create a Seed-Embryo marker, same as from Infinity SHASVASTII lvl 5 ‘Witness Me!’ gallery.

I USED:

  • Super Glue,
  • Basing Glue,
  • Office Clips,
  • Toothpicks,
  • Small balls (airsoft gun ammo)
  • Hobby Cutters & Hobby Tweezers,

*  I started by straightening two office clips, leaving both ends curved.

*  I then wraped them around one another and once done, cut a piece with hobby cutters.

*  Next I applied a drop of basing glue, followed by a drop of super glue onto a base.

*  Then I glued wraped up office clip piece on top of the super glue spot.

*  Airsoft gun ammo ball followed, on top of the office clip piece. First a drop of super glue, then basing glue, then I slightly dipped the ball in super glue and glued it on.

*  Lastly I modelled three growth pieces on top of the ball, applying a small dose of basing glue with a tootpick, then covering it with super glue.

And that’s it! The Seed-Embryo markers ready in few minutes. Just make sure you let them dry before painting – I recommend about 4 hours for super glue – basing glue mix to fully dry out and produce awesome texture.


Do you like this tutorial? Have you made your own Seed-Embryo markers? Be sure to let me know in the commets below!

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Tutorial: Enhancing Necromunda Bases

Necromunda: Underhive is a game full of nicely detailed plastic miniatures. As much as I hate endorsing Games Workshop – It should be mentioned that in terms of miniatures – they did a really nice job, extending the set so that it includes 25 industrial themed plastic bases. I appreciate this move from GW, even tho the variety of Necromunda bases designs is scarce. For example my own set came with just two versions among a total of ten bases. This is where I come in with a Tutorial on how to Enchance Necromunda bases in a fast, simple way. Below you will find few ideas on how to do it – but let me say this in advance: keep an open mind cause there’s plenty of awesome stuff that can be used to differentiate your Necromunda bases set (and actually any Industrial bases).

I USED:

  • Hobby Knife,
  • Scissors,
  • Plastic Cutter,
  • Hobby Drill,
  • Super Glue,
  • Brass Mesh,
  • Brass Chain,
  • PCV,
  • Games Workshop bitz,
  • Games Workshop skulls,
  • Astrogranite Debris Texture Paint,

 

BRASS MESH:

This stuff can be found in most modellers hobby stores. Personally I love it, cause it let’s me add awesome texture to the bases. It is very easy to use. I tend to cut a piece of mesh with scissors and glue it onto a designated surface, leaving an excess to hang outside the base. Once Super Glue dries out I just cut the excess mesh with scissors and file it on the edge – driving a file from top to bottom of the bases edge. This keeps the mesh glued onto the base, but smoothers the edge nicely.

BRASS CHAIN:

Another item from a hobby store. I just glue it onto the base and cut the excess with plastic cutters. Brass Chain is thin and rather frail so it does not damage the cutters.

PCV:

Awesome, hobby friendly and easy to use material. It comes in either flat sheets of different thickness, or in prefabricated shapes. For bases I usually use flat sheets, gluing them onto the base, then cutting to fit the edge. In case of Necromunda bases – there’s plenty of industrial texture already, so I uused a prefabricated piece of PCV to add here and there. Same technique – glue onto the base, then cut to match the edge.

GW BITZ:

Everybody has some. For Necromunda bases I preffered thin, long spears and banner poles. I just glued them over certain areas and cut with a plastic cutters to match the edge of the base and add variety to the base’s surface.

SKULLS:

Games Workshop’s Skulls set is something that everyone should get. If you haven’t got yours – damn – just go and order one. For what you get the price is just insane. Either way – some Skulls on the base would certainly make it stand out.

ASTROGRANITE DEBRIS:

Actually any grain-texture paint would do just fine. I used Astrogranit Debris cause I don’t have many uses for this particular colour and here it is meant to go under a black undercoat anyway. I applied small amount to certain places, just to add texture.

HOBBY DRILL:

I drilled some holes in different sizes here and there to look like corrosion or some form of acid damage. Easy to do – looks cool once painted.

 

So, there’s that. These are just few ways to enchance Necromunda bases. I bet you can find a lot more ways to differentiate the set. Here’s how mine looks like after the above additions:

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Tutorial: DIY Infinity Camo Markers

In this article I would like to present to you an easy way to prepare and then paint your own Camo Markers for Infinity the Game.

I USED:

  • PCV
  • Ruler
  • Pencil
  • Hobby Knife
  • 25mm Bases

 

PREPARATION:

Obviously, the preparation process was pretty simple. Using a ruler, pencil and hobby knife I first drawn and then cut  five 25x47mm rectangles made of PCV. I then glued them on top of 25mm round bases. At this point Camo Markers were ready to get painted.

PAINTING:

1  First step was to undercoat entire Camo Markers with Vallejo's Desert Tan.

2  Next I used a piece of synthetic hair holder as a stencil and airbrushed Vallejo Light Brown over the Markers.

3  Then I switched to Vallejo Earth and airbrushed it over the markers using a piece of net that I got patatoes in. This net should be easily obtainable in every grocery store and makes for a really cool stencil.

4  I then got back to hair holder stencil and airbrushed a layer of Vallejo Light Grey Green.

5  Next I airbrushed points of Vallejo Dark Flesh.

6  Some wet stippling went next. First I applied clumsy dots of Vallejo German Red Brown, then did the same with Games Workshop Pallid Wych Flesh. Afterwards I used Pallid Wych Flesh to mark edges of the markers and provide number to distinguish them from one another on the gaming board.

7  Basing came last. I used Games Workshop Agrellan Earth and Agrellan Badland, then drybrushed them with Karak Stone and Flayed One Flesh. Work done.

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Tutorial: Modelling Exploding Miniatures

In this easy, step-by-step tutorial I’m going to show you how to create an ‘explosion from inside’ effect on the miniatures. Personally I use this method to create exploding mines or in this case Crazy Koalas from Infinity the game, but the number of potential uses is limited only by your imagination. That being said, buckle up and have a nice ride.

I USED:

  • Super Glue,
  • Green Stuff,
  • Modelling Tools,
  • Two ‘Crazy Koala’ miniatures,

1  I started with cutting the miniature diagonally in two. I didn't thought too much about where to cut, just about the waist, leaving one hand attached to the lower part of the body.

2  I then rolled some Green Stuff and glued it onto the lower body part.

3  Next I applied a small drop of Super Glue onto the Green Stuff and attached the upper body part to it.

4  Then I squeezed both part, forcing the Green Stuff out.

5  Next I gently pulled both body parts away, creating a gap with rended Green Stuff inbetween the parts.

6  Next I rolled another piece of Green Stuff and repeated the technique, adding head to the miniature.

7  After pulling the head away I used a modelling tool to stretch the excess Green Stuff to the sides.

8  I also applied Super Glue onto the Green Stuff to fasten it's hardening.

The end result is below:

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Tutorial: Modelling Witch Hunter’s Hat

Last weeks I’ve been diverting more and more attention to Mordheim. Maybe that’s because I’ve been playing PC version lately. Either way, every couple of years I get that ‘Mordheim fever’ and delve deep into my imagination, staying up whole nights, making something cool for my own Mordheim collection. Right now I work on a brand new Mordheim gaming board thus I figured out to revive an old Tutorial from Mordheim Treasure Hunters blog and add it to the collection here at Scarhandpainting. More articles are already prepared, but I somehow felt like this one will be a nice way to close the 2016th.

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Below I will show you a quick way of making a Witch Hunter’s Hat with basic tools, some green stuff and some plastic leftovers. The thing about Witch Hunter’s Hats is that they are extremely rare and yet they look just awesome. A lot of miniatures can be reborn as proper Witch Hunters just by adding this small detail. So, here’s how I do it:

I USED:

* Modelling Knife,
* Sculpting Tools,
* Modellin File,
* Green Stuff,
* Super Glue,
* Some round and flat plastic bitz (heads in helmets will do too),
* Some tubular sprue plastic bitz (easy to get as they’re in almost every sprue),

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1  I started with preparation of hat parts. For this purpose I used round shaped plastic bitz, cutting off the excess of plastic with Modelling Knife first, then flattening the top area with a Modelling File. Next I used a Modelling Knife to cut tubular sprue bitz into nice hat top pieces. This is how it should look like when done:

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2  I then glued the pieces together, prepared a piece of Green Stuff and rolled it into a thin line. I also cut small pieces of Green Stuff loose and rolled them into small balls.

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3  I applied some Super Glue around the connection between hat's top and brim. I then applied a Green Stuff rolled piece onto the glue and flattened it with a Sculpting Tool modelling it into a strap. For this purpose I used a rounded part just behind the tip of a Sculpting Tool.

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4  I smoothed the texture of starps using a Sculpting Tool dipped in water. I then left the hats to dry.

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5  Once the Green Stuff dried out I applied Super Glue onto a piece of plastic, sticked a Green Stuff ball onto the tip of a Sculpting Tool, gently dipped it in the glue and applied it to a hat's strip. I also flattened the ball with the other (rounded) end of a Sculpting Tool thus creating a clasp.

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6  In the end I modelled a pattern on each clasp with the sharp tip of a Sculpting Tool. Once it was done I let the Green Stuff to dry out. Instead of modelling a clasp yourself, you can use any well sized bitz or even a piece of plastic. Actually anything fitting the hat's strap will do.

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The final effect may not be outstanding but it will do the job of transforming your Imperial Mercenary, or any other miniature into a badass Witch Hunter. See for yourself in the  Warband: ‘Scourge of the Witches’ gallery. Here’s a preview pic:

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I hope you like the tutorial. It is an old piece but I really wanted to have it here at Scarhandpainting.

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Tutorial: DIY Candles

Winter is already here thus I thought about warming the theme a bit by introducing a tutorial of how to make candles for 28-30mm scale. Why produce such things? In miniatures hobby candles are rare bitz among what you get in the sets designed by main miniature producers. Even if a set contains some, their number is scarce. Why not make your own and adorn bases, miniatures and even scenery with them? Be it Age of Sigmar, Mordheim, Warhammer 40,000 or just a fantasy dungeon – candles will provide mood to both miniatures and scenery. Below is a quick and easy step-by-step of how to produce your own 28-30mm scale candles. Enjoy…

I USED:

  • Super Glue,
  • Basing Glue,
  • Toothpicks,
  • Tissue,
  • Thin Wire,
  • Modelling Tools,

1  I started with preparation of candles-to-be by cutting toothpicks into small pieces. I tried to keep all of them between 5-10mm long, to better fit into the 28-30mm fantasy scale. Once I had couple pieces done I choose some of them and drilled small holes from one side. These will be used later to hold candlewicks.

2  Next I glued the candles onto the base. In case of scenery I usually drill small holes to hold the candles in place or just glue them as it is if I'm sure the scenery won't require enchanced durability. For the purpose of this tutorial I drilled some holes in an old square Warhammer base.

3  I then glued small pieces of wire into the holes, to look like candlewicks.

4  Then came the time to cover the candles with a basing glue, applying additional glue around the base of each candle to create an effect of spilled wax.

5  Next step was to prepare couple of small flames, using a wet paper tissue. I just rolled, then cut it into small pieces, which I then rolled once again.

6  The flames where then glued to the candles with super glue and once in place - covered with glue to harden entirely.

7  I left the stuff to dry, then painted it with mix of creme and white, washed the candlewicks and flames with some washes.

The end result will look more or less like this:

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Tutorial: DIY Infinity Console

Welcome to Modelling Infinity Console tutorial, a short Step-by-step trip through a process of creating Consoles perfect for objective markers in Infinity the Game and other Sci-fi wargames. 
You may consider this article to be an extension of “Tutorial: Infinity ‘Do It Yourself’ Gaming Terrain”, in which I tried to inspire you to hunt for some awesome everyday items. Pieces of what might be considered garbage, and yet an awesome source of unlimited potential, when it comes to scenery making.

 

Before we start, some notes:

  • This article is from 16 March 2016 and was (thanks to popularity of over 13000 visits!) recently refreshed with new pictures and description. 
  • Consoles presented in the pictures might be a bit tattered due to being old.
  • As usual, please take note that what works for me might not necessarily work for you.

 

Backstory:

The story behind the idea is rather trivial. Years back I was taking a shower, saw my wife’s shower gel bottle and was instantly struck by a surge of inspiration. Colored, clear top element was just too cool to pass by. Transformation from a shower gel plug to a tiny console came natural. Just see for yourself.

 

Modelling:

I used:

  • Fa Shower Gel plug,
  • Hobby Knife, Hobby Cutters, Super Glue,
  • Random trash,

 

Step one: Main Body

I started by cutting off the plug and pulling out the acrylic part. I then used a hobby knife to thin down the bottom of the acrylic part so that it went in and out smoothly. 

Step two: Support

Back in the days I cut 3mm thick PCV and created four legs for the console. On the next attempt, being more experienced, I used an old Spray nozzle. Since then I tested a lot of random stuff, but given a choice I prefer the nozzle above anything else. One man’s trash is another man’s awesome Console support!

Step three: Detail

Thin pieces of PCV, lollipop sticks, Airsoft Gun ceramic balls, plastic miniatures bitz – anything will do for an awesome filler. The idea behind the console is a 3d hologram of a city space, or and enhanced molecule view. Whatever is put inside and sprayed white will look great. I leave this to your imagination.

Step four: Paint job

I painted entire console white to fit my own gaming board. Looking back I strongly recommend painting the inside white to take advantage of the vibrant color mounted on top. Other than that anything will do. 

Final result:

Since 2016 I made few dozen consoles. These, being the first set, will always have a special place in my heart. 

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Bonus Pic: (different scenery piece)

I hope you like the article. If it ever inspires you to make your own Fa Shower Gel consoles, be sure to tag me at Facebook @scarhandpainting or Instagram _scarhandpainting so I can enjoy your work. Cheers!

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