• contact@scarhandpainting.com

Tag Archives: youtube

TUTORIAL: MODELLING OVERGROWN BASES

Today I’m going to reveal one of my dearest secrets: how Super Glue and Basing Glue can be used to make some fantastic, crazy, awesome stuff! I have invented it by accident when I was a kid, used it since and love it for both simplicity and awesome texture effect. In this easy, step-by-step tutorial I will show you how to produce your own Overgrown Bases!

I USED:

  • Super Glue,
  • Basing Glue,
  • Birch-tree seeds*
  • Bitz of dried out grapes**
  • Random small balls***

*I purchased a huge pack of these for approximately 1€,

**Once you eat up all the goodie goodie grapes, you have like a bunch of wooden leftovers. Once dried out these are awesome bor basing miniatures.

***I use either Air Soft Gun ammuniton, or for smaller calliber moist absorber balls obtainable with every new pair of shoes. Just ask your gf to dig out one of her shoeboxes, there should be a small paper bag filled with tiny, translucent balls in it.

1  I started by applying basing glue all over the base. No need to make it smooth, just enough not to leave any empty spaces.

2  I then dropped some of the tiny balls and Birch-tree seeds over the wet glue.

3  Here's where MAGIC begun. I covered entire base with Super Glue and watched as it was warped before my eyes in a matter of merely seconds.

4  Before it dried out I added some pieces of dry grape vines to make it look like some strange, alien mushrooms, or plants. I then covered additional stuff with more Super Glue to harden it.

5  Last step was to leave entire thing to dry out. Usually it takes around five minutes for a base to get dry, but it might take a bit longer, depending on how much basing glue is used.

6  The final step was to undercoat dried out base with Chaos Black spray... then do a quick paint job with random colours.

Now seriously – tell my that’s not an awesome texture effect XD This is like ultra-fast, mega-cool way of using two glues to create utter chaos on any surface. Chaos mutations, warped stuff, Zerg creep, alien planet foliage, jungle floor, faerie glade, name it – then glue+glue it 😉

Do not hesitate to let me know and send some pictures via FACEBOOK if you ever use the tutorial. I will be happy to see how it turned out 😉

Zapisz

Zapisz

Zapisz

Zapisz

Zapisz

Zapisz

Zapisz

Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInPin on Pinterest
Nazroth

REVIEW: BRUSH CLASH TAMIYA vs CITADEL

Welcome to the Painting Arena! A fight the of century is before us! In the left corner we have a ‘Citadel Layer S’ brush! When it comes to painting miniatures this hobby brush is a Games Workshop’s bread and butter! Worth approximately 4,3 €, Citadel Layer S will be clashed against a cheaper Tamiya 87050. Tamiya’s approximate worth is only 3,4 € but it has a fighting spirit like no other! Which brush will emerge victorious? Which one will fall to oblivion? Buckle up and see for yourself…

Brush Clash Tamiya vs Citadel 5

I used a Infinity: Lunokhod miniature that could use some paint job to clash Citadel Layer S against Tamiya 87050. Both of these brushes had seen some action but not enough to be called a ‘veteran’. Let’s say that both were purchased recently and were used just couple of times before this clash. For the purpose of this article I used Games Workshop’s Mechrite Red. Till now I had no problems using this paint. It’s consistency let’s me paint constantly for a long period of time before I need to either clean or switch brushes. I started by applying Mechrite Red on one leg of the miniature – I used an unrelated brush for that, to check out the paint. It went good, so I switched to Citadel Layer S. This is how it looked after painting a single Lunokhod’s leg…

Brush Clash Tamiya vs Citadel 11

After only one part of the miniature entire brush turned into utter chaos. Hair behaved like if they really ‘wanted’ to disperse. I had a lot of difficulity covering the entire surface without moisting and reposing the brush (which I didn’t for the sake of this article).

Next in line was Tamiya 87050 and I’ve painted both rear legs with it before taking a picture…

Brush Clash Tamiya vs Citadel 12

As you can see Tamiya 87050 hair held ground and stayed composed. I wandered how long this brush can stay this way so I kept painting and painted entire Lunokhod without ever reposing brush’s tip. Here’s the result…

Brush Clash Tamiya vs Citadel 13

Tamiya 87050 stayed composed till the end. Must say that regardless of using Tamiya’s brushes for some time now – I was surprised to see it’s performance. Check out the video below to see how the clash proceeded…

RESULTS:

After long battle in which a lot of paint was spilled – Tamiya 87050 emerged a victor! Not only cheaper but much – MUCH – more durable and paint job friendly. The tip worked well throughout the entire process with hair flexible and pose reshaping itself. This kind of brush will surely provide you with comfort. Opposite to that Citadel Layer S failed after merely seconds of usage. It’s tip went berzerk the instant I started painting. I would never recommend this kind of brush for anything except washing or applying glue. I wander why I’ve tolerated this kind of brush’s behaviour till now… well it’s either trash or death in suicide mission for this one now. Will never purchase another Games Workshop’s brush again.

Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInPin on Pinterest
Nazroth

TUTORIAL: SPRAY UNDERCOAT

Every once in awhile I stumble upon a question of how to undercoat miniatures properly. Well – there are many techniques of undercoating miniatures and each individual hobbyist has his own favorite style.  I’ve figured that instead of writing all the know-how again and again – I can prepare a solid Tutorial of what I consider to be my favorite technique and just link it to all the hobbyists in need. Below you will find both a video version and extended picture version of Tutorial: Spray Undercoat – Eight Sides Technique.

TUTORIAL: SPRAY UNDERCOAT - VIDEO VERSION:

TUTORIAL: SPRAY UNDERCOAT - EXTENDED VERSION:

1  I start by preparing a setup for the miniatures. I immobilize the miniatures on a piece of wood using a protective duct tape. I place them so that I have access to the biggest part of their bodies both before and after turning them around.

undercoat 1

2  Now comes the time to shake the spray can a bit. Usually it takes between one to three minutes. I don't believe in all that 'ten minutes shakeup' bulsh... In my entire life I never done this for more than three minutes. So I just shake the can up and down in a quick succession. Once the ball inside it slides smoothly i proceed to the next step.

undercoat 2

!  WARNING - Some sprays are just like girls - usual shaking up and down can turn out to be fatal. For example - Army Painter Primers tend to get sandy and rought after shaking them too much. I always move the can in small circles so that the ball inside is sliding on the bottom.

undercoat 21

3  Time to start spraying! I spray the miniatures from a distance between 20-30cm (that's 8-12 inches), with small controlled bursts at an 45 degree angle. I start with spraying the miniatures from up and down, skipping right and left side for the time being.

!  WHEN I'M DONE I WAIT FOR AROUND TEN MINUTES BEFORE PROCEEDING TO THE NEXT STEP.

undercoat 3

4  I repeat the action but this time I spray both the right and left side of the miniatures. Still I use the same distance of 20-30cm, same angle and small bursts.

!  WHEN I'M DONE I WAIT FOR AROUND TEN MINUTES BEFORE PROCEEDING TO THE NEXT STEP.

undercoat 4

5  I turn around the miniatures so that the unpainted surface is fully accessible.

undercoat 5

6  I repeat step '3' spraying the miniatures from the up and down side, skipping right and left side, following to previous indications (20-30cm, 45 degree, small bursts).

!  WHEN I'M DONE I WAIT FOR AROUND TEN MINUTES BEFORE PROCEEDING TO THE NEXT STEP.

undercoat 6

6  I repeat step '4' spraying the miniatures from the right and left side, following to previous indications (20-30cm, 45 degree, small bursts).

!  WHEN I'M DONE I WAIT FOR AROUND TEN MINUTES FOR THE MINIATURES TO DRY UP.

undercoat 7

That’s all – no magic or special tricks involved – just plain, easy technique. Some may consider eight layers to be too much, but I like to have my miniatures undercoated properly with no ‘shine’ visible and a solid layer of paint. Still if done properly – no detail will be dulled.

I hope you like this Tutorial – if so – please go and spread the word so that no newbe will have any problems with undercoating ever again 🙂

 

This Tutorial is my debut at youtube – you can see my channel here…

Zapisz

Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInPin on Pinterest
Nazroth
1