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Tag Archives: Tutorial

AIRBRUSH FOR BEGINNERS – What you need to start…

Allright, so you decided to start with an airbrush. You’ve made some reconnaissance, picked an airbrush and compressor and the only question that stands between you and a lifetime of airbrushing is “what else do I need to start?”. This very question was asked to me a lot since I myself started airbrushing. It might be about time to turn the answer into a short article, in hope to help all the beginner hobbyists out there…

NECESSITIES:

Assuming you’ve already picked an airbrush and compressor, there’s still a list of items you should get before you’ll be able to start airbrushing. Let’s dive head on into the list of necessary items…

Air Hose

Air hose is used to link the airbrush with compressor. When picking an air hose it is important to check which models of airbrush / compressors it’s fitting is compatible with. You can simply ask the store to recommend you an air hose compatible with types of fitting of your airbrush / compressor.

Adapter / Multi Way Valve Assembly

In case your airbrush has different type of fitting than the compressor, you will also require an Adapter, or a Multi Way Vavle Assembly with a proper type of connection. Take a look at E-Bay to see how many different types of fitting there are…

Spray Out Airbrush Pot & Airbrush holder

A filter equipped spray out airbrush pot and an airbrush holder (prefferably 2 in 1 like below) are also necessary. Thanks to these you will have an option to rest the airbrush on a holder inbetween different activities (like mixing paints, or even resting for a bit). Spray out airbrush pot will also keep the majority of paint waste contained in an easy to clean glass pot.

Cleaning Brushes

You will use these too clean up the insides of your airbrush.

Nozzle Cleaning Tool

You will use this tool to clean up the nozzle. When picking this one up make sure it is recommended for the type of nozzle of your airbrush. Too large tool might damage the nozzle.

(On the picture top: ALDER tool, damages H&S nozzles! bottom: H&S tool, perfect for H&S nozzles)

Water Bowl & Nozzled Plastic Bottle

You will use this duo to remove the excess of paint from your airbrush without the need to spray it all out.

Airbrush Cleaner, Airbrush Thinner, Airbrush Flow Improover

Airbrush Cleaner, Airbrush Thinner and Airbrush Flow Improover – these three liquids are a must have.

OTHER STUFF:

Below are some additional items that while not necessary, will come in handy once you start airbrushing your way to hobby glory.

Spare Needle

Airbrush needle is very delicate. A vast majority of beginners damage the needle during first few days of airbrush adventure. I advise you to get a spare needle, just in case.

Medium Round Brush

Long hair, medium size, round brush to remove excess paint from the tip of the needle without the need to dismantle entire airbrush.

Mixing Tool & Mixing Cups

You might use these to mix paints before pouring them into the cup on top of airbrush to avoid clods of paint to get inside.

PAINTS...:

Obviously you will require paints. It is not necessary to get any type of special airbrush paints. Thanks to Flow Improover and Thinner regular paints will do, but that’s a story for another article…

Thanks for reading. If you think I skipped a necessary or useful item that a beginner airbrush users should get, let me know in the comments section. Cheers!

Nazroth

TUTORIAL: MODELLING LUSH BASES

In this easy, step-by-step tutorial I’m going to show you how to create a Lush Base. I designed these bases to fit Infinity the Game Tohaa ‘tactical rocks’ – you can see how it turned out at Infinity TOHAA ‘Witness Me!’ gallery.

I USED:

  • Super Glue,
  • Basing Glue,
  • Stirland Battlemire (GW texture paint),
  • Paint Forge Tufts,
  • Random Tufts,
  • Dried out Grape branch,

*  I started by separating Grape mounts from the dried out Grape branch. Being rather soft, their topf have been removed to improove durability and shape.

*  I then applied a drop of basing glue onto the base, followed up shortly by another drop - this time super glue.

*  Before mixed glue drop was able to dry out I've planted Grape mount on top of it, creating strange looking plant.

*  Once glue dried up I've painted the bases following choosen colour scheme (see below). I then added some texture on top of them with Stirland Battlemire texture paint.

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*  Last step was to apply regular tufts. I used some noname tufts in large numbers filling most of the flat areas. Job done.

BONUS COLOUR RECIPE:

:

Black Undercoat,

Stirland Battlemire (GW), texture

Karak Stone (GW), stones & plants

Flayed One Flesh (GW), flatbrush stones & plants

Mix Strong Tone Ink (AP) 1:1 Soft Tone Ink (AP), wash

Nazroth

TUTORIAL: PAINTING CORREGIDOR BASES (BASIC)

In this Step-by-Step tutorial I would like to take you on a spin with some Micro Art Studio’s Corregidor Bases. Guys from MAS did a fantastic job painting this product, but I have my own way which I would like to share with you. Buckle up and let’s get to it!

I USED:

* Regular Brush,

* Stippling Brush,

* Black,

* Tin Bitz / Warplock Bronze (GW)

* Eshin Grey (GW),

* Strong Tone Ink (AP),

* Gun Metal (AP),

* Shining Silver (AP),

* Scorched Brown (GW),

* Calthan Brown (GW),

* Ryza Rust (GW),

* Lugganath Orange (GW),

* Flayed One Flesh (GW),

 

!  You can achieve similar results using different paints as long as you followTutorial's basics. For example Eshin Grey (GW) might be switched for Panzer Dark Grey (Val).

1  I started by applying a layer of Eshin Grey (GW) to all raised areas of the base, over Black undercoat. Just a hint that applying two slightly diluted layers goes much faster and produces a similar result.

2  I then moved to the mesh areas and painted them with Warplock Bronze (GW). Once again this paint might be diluted but this time no need to apply two layers - one will suffice.

3  Once Warplock Bronze dried out, I applied a layer of Gun Metal (AP). For best results I did this with regular brush and using a Flatbrush technique following:

Five Layers Technique – Metal  basis

4  Next Shining Silver (AP) came in. I applied one layer over Gun Metal with regular brush, Flatbrushing.

5  I then applied a wet, thick layer of Strong Tone Ink (AP) over entire base. Once it dried out - I applied another, identical layer. (Picture seem grey'ish - in real life this would look more brown and juicy)

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1  Using either a Stippling brush or a well used up large brush I applied stains of Scorched Brown (GW) over all raised areas. Was carefull not to use too much paint.

2  I then drybrushed edges and some large parts of raised areas using Calthan Brown (GW).

3  Next I Stippled some Ryza Rust (GW) on top of previous layer, ensuring to leave some Calthan Brown visible.

4  Same technique, different paint. I stippled Lugganath Orange (GW) on top of Ryza Rust layer, leaving previous layer visible on the sides of the new one.

!  From this layer onward I usually paint over both raised and mesh areas. For the purpose of this Tutorial I left mesh parts clean, but do not be alarmed if you see pictures of my own bases with a less differentiated colour scheme.

5  Flayed one Flesh (GW) followed. This time I Drybrushed over Lugganath Orange layer and then used regular brush to paint thin lines on the edges.

6  Adding a final touch I painted edges smooth Black to add contrast and keep the paint job clean.

That’s it – you have followed me on my short journey from black undercoat to finished Corregidor Bases. Below you will find some examples of finished Corregidor Bases. Each bunch turns out slightly different from the rest. That’s because a slight difference in surface coverage or layer to layer proportion might result in change of how eye can see these bases. Either way – here they are:

Nazroth

TUTORIAL: ERASING BLOOPERS

Painting bloopers – something that happens to all of us, hobbyists, regardless of skill level and experience. In my everyday painting practice bloopers happen all the time. This led me into ‘Improvise. Adapt. Overcome.’ kind of situation and today I would like to present to you a way of dealing with painting mistakes.

I USED:

  • Wooden toothpick
  • Water
  • Gentle touch and persistence 😛

1  First let's take a look at this ugly bastard of a line. One moment everything goes smooth, then BAM! and I end up with an ugly line that stands out like crazy. Repainting entire fragment of the coat with many layers is out of question. At this point I can only try to thin the line down by erasing part of it. I grab a wooden tootphick...

2  ...and dip it in a water filled bowl. After 15-20 seconds I use a paper towel to remove excess water from the softened tip of the toothpick. My 'Blooper Eraser' is ready for action.

3  I always start by touching the surface perpendicularly with the soft tip of the 'Blooper Eraser'. Then I move the tool gently up and down along the surface, softening the paint and stripping major shape of a blooper.

4  Once desirable shape is achieved, assuming I don't want to erase entire thing, I use an edge of the tip to further improve the shape.

5  Removing paint from the edges works very similarly, except that instead of the tip, I use side of the toothpick, . This way 'Blooper Eraser' is easy to control and stay on target.

And that’s actually it. You now know my secret technique of creating the ‘Blooper Eraser’ and saying goodbye to ugly bloopers. This technique works for me like a charm and I do hope it will work  for you as well. Cheers!

Nazroth

TUTORIAL: PAINTING SKIN (BASIC)

Painting skin – nightmare for some, EZ for others. Back in the days I’ve struggled with a proper skin tone, my miniatures turning out too dark, or skin being overall flat and uninterresting. Practicing ‘Five Layers Technique‘ for many years, led me to some realisations and now I am able to present to you my ultimate way of basic skin painting.

I USED:

* Regular Brush,

* Bugmans Glow (GW),

* Dwarf Flesh (GW),

* Flesh (Val AIR),

* Strong Tone Ink (AP),

* Soft Tone Ink (AP),

* Pale Flesh (Val),

!  You can achieve similar results using different paints and avoiding mixes, as long as you follow Five Layers Technique basics. For example Bugmans Glow (GW) might be switched for Tanned Flesh (AP) or Tan (Vallejo).

!  You can start by applying first layer on any surface. This method does not require any special preparation, like re-painting surface to primer black etc.

1  I started by applying an underlayer of Bugmans Glow paint over any surface destined to become skin. This layer might be a bit messy and is not meant to be smooth, only to cover entire surface. For this particular layer I encourage thinning the paint a bit to help it flow into recesses.

2  Next I applied a main layer of Dwarf Flesh. This time I tried to keep paint from flowing into recesses and made sure that it will cover all big flat areas.

3  I then applied a layer made of a 1:1 mix of Dwarf Flesh and Flesh over all raised areas. This is suposed to be the first highligh and provides a difference in skin tones over the model. Don't worry if some piant flows into recesses, just try to avoid covering everything with it.

4  Here came the flood of wash. I applied a 1:1 mix of Army Painter's Strong Tone Ink with Soft Tone Ink. As usual I didn't bother to be subtle about it.

5  Once dried, I highlighted skin with a 1:1 mix of Elf Skintone and Pale Flesh. This usually is the final highlight and is meant to POP the skin.

!  If I was to enchance skin a bit and move forward from this point, I would add points of focus with lines and dots of Pale Flesh. Some deeper spots can also be in-lined with Flesh Tone or some brown-ish wash to build contrast but that's for another article.

Nazroth

TUTORIAL: PAINTING BROWN MILITARY COATS

How about I show you a technique to paint brown military coats like a pro in a way so simple that it’ll make you wander why haven’t you painted like that before? Below is a simple Step-by-step tutorial on how to achieve awesome tattered and used up leather brown coat effect in just few simple steps.

First some home brewed theory.

Stippling: A technique of creating texture out of dozens of tiny dots of paint. Easiest way to achieve this is to use a Stippling Brush (round head, tip cut off – flat surface instead, resilient hair).

Blending: A technique of gently intermingling two or more colors to create a gradual transition or to soften lines. Below I will demonstrate a rather crude version of it.

I USED:

* Stippling Brush (GW),

* Regular Brush,

* Olive Drab (Vallejo AIR),

* Pallid Wych Flesh (GW),

* Strong Tone Ink (AP),

1  You can start painting this on any dark surface, but for good result I recommend to prepare the surface, by following steps 1 to 3 of Painting 'Infinity' Black Tutorial. This will transition into a complex and interresting surface to work on. On a bright side neither these nor following layers require precision and are really fast to paint.

TUTORIAL: PAINTING ‘INFINITY’ BLACK

2  Time to stipple. I used a Stippling brush and Pallid Wych Flesh paint. I left the excess paint on the palette and randomly applied some dots onto the coat.

3  Next I mixed Olive Drab 1:1 with Strong Tone Ink and applied it all over the coat. This is the crude version of blending I mentioned earlier. It has not much to do with actual blending technique, except it changes the color and actually 'blends'.

4  Wash comes last. I applied a strong, wet layer of Strong Tone Ink all over the coat. Once dry - paint job is done.

!  This might be the end to it, but if you preffer to take your paint job to a higher level you can for example 'edge' the coat with a brighter brown/leathery colour. From now on you have a great looking base to add detail to and it was achieved in no time.

TUTORIAL: PAINTING EDGES

 

Nazroth

PAINTING PHILOSOPHY part three EDGE OF TOMORROW

PROLOGUE:

Third time’s a charm thus welcome to the third ‘Painting Philosophy’ article, where “I let you in on ‘how’ and especially ‘why’ I do some things in a certain way. In my opinion a proper approach to painting is crucial to maintain healthy and rewarding experience. Final result depends on it in the same way as on techniques, know-how and tools used. Nowadays internet is full of painting tutorials yet it takes some inner understanding of our own capabilities to find what suits us best and fully benefit from all acquired knowledge. That being said – In this series I will reveal what works best for me as a painter. I hope you will find some wisdom in it…”

PAINTING PHILOSOPHY: EDGING TECHNIQUE

In last article I wrote a lot about the edge of a base and what it represents. Do not let yourself get fooled by a similar title tho, as today I would like to take a slightly different approach. I introduce to you the ‘Edging technique’. Something that I myself am addicted to since Games Workshop lured me in with their EDGE paints series. Before that I struggled to keep my colours juicy and interresting enough. Kept to dark, murky colour schemes and avoided any type of lining, including edges. That translated into being a bit dissapointed with my own works – so a not very healthy relationship with paints and miniatures. It all changed once I got my hands on GW’s EDGE paints and that was just the first step which made me realize how important strong edges, combined with proper Lining, are.

What it actually does?

Edging, better known as ‘edge highlighting’ is a technique of applying paint to the natural edges of a surface, providing strong contrast and exposing the mentioned surface. I find Edging, combined with Lining, to be a great way to make a colour pop and literally change how an eye can perceive it. It works especially well with multi-layered surfaces of detailed miniatures but should work for you regardless of what miniatures you paint. Here’s an example of Edging being one of key factors to improove a paint job:

Why this method?

I’m not a guy that looks at miniatures through magnifier glass. I mostly paint projects related with gaming and this kind of miniatures should be able to catch an eye while being used. I like my miniatures to pop, to be sharp and  ‘edgy’. To have personality and coherent colour scheme. For me Edging provides all that and more.

How I do it?

First of all, like with most painting methods, I avoid overloading my brush with too much paint. This is very important as too much paint would run down and ruin a crisp, sharp edge. Other than that I try to:

  • Keep the tip of a brush positioned perpendicularly to the line of the edge and drive it along the edge from from one side to the other. This helps to avoid the tip moving off the edge and paint all around it.

  • Hold a brush near the tip. This gives me a lot of control over the tip and it’s movement.

  • Keep the tip of a brush positioned at about 90 degrees to the edge, which usually keeps it from going point forward and leave paint in recesses.

  • Pick a right paint for the job. This is not limited to GW’s EDGE paints only. Any paint that provides enough contrast, works well with a choosen colour and has enough pigment will do.

EXAMPLES:

EPILOGUE:

Now you know how I approach edge highlighting and with this I would like to close third Painting Philosophy article. Please take note that what works for me, might not necessarily work for you – still there are many ways to accomplish certain things – mine is just one of them. I encourage you to leave some feedback. As usual I put a lot of effort into preparing this article, but if it helps at least one painter out there – I consider it a time well spent.

This would be extremely ‘paitnful’… for you.

Nazroth

TUTORIAL: ENHANCING NECROMUNDA BASES

Necromunda: Underhive is a game full of nicely detailed plastic miniatures. As much as I hate endorsing Games Workshop – It should be mentioned that in terms of miniatures – they did a really nice job, extending the set so that it includes 25 industrial themed plastic bases. I appreciate this move from GW, even tho the variety of Necromunda bases designs is scarce. For example my own set came with just two versions among a total of ten bases. This is where I come in with a Tutorial on how to Enchance Necromunda bases in a fast, simple way. Below you will find few ideas on how to do it – but let me say this in advance: keep an open mind cause there’s plenty of awesome stuff that can be used to differentiate your Necromunda bases set (and actually any Industrial bases).

I USED:

  • Hobby Knife,
  • Scissors,
  • Plastic Cutter,
  • Hobby Drill,
  • Super Glue,
  • Brass Mesh,
  • Brass Chain,
  • PCV,
  • Games Workshop bitz,
  • Games Workshop skulls,
  • Astrogranite Debris Texture Paint,

 

BRASS MESH:

This stuff can be found in most modellers hobby stores. Personally I love it, cause it let’s me add awesome texture to the bases. It is very easy to use. I tend to cut a piece of mesh with scissors and glue it onto a designated surface, leaving an excess to hang outside the base. Once Super Glue dries out I just cut the excess mesh with scissors and file it on the edge – driving a file from top to bottom of the bases edge. This keeps the mesh glued onto the base, but smoothers the edge nicely.

BRASS CHAIN:

Another item from a hobby store. I just glue it onto the base and cut the excess with plastic cutters. Brass Chain is thin and rather frail so it does not damage the cutters.

PCV:

Awesome, hobby friendly and easy to use material. It comes in either flat sheets of different thickness, or in prefabricated shapes. For bases I usually use flat sheets, gluing them onto the base, then cutting to fit the edge. In case of Necromunda bases – there’s plenty of industrial texture already, so I uused a prefabricated piece of PCV to add here and there. Same technique – glue onto the base, then cut to match the edge.

GW BITZ:

Everybody has some. For Necromunda bases I preffered thin, long spears and banner poles. I just glued them over certain areas and cut with a plastic cutters to match the edge of the base and add variety to the base’s surface.

SKULLS:

Games Workshop’s Skulls set is something that everyone should get. If you haven’t got yours – damn – just go and order one. For what you get the price is just insane. Either way – some Skulls on the base would certainly make it stand out.

ASTROGRANITE DEBRIS:

Actually any grain-texture paint would do just fine. I used Astrogranit Debris cause I don’t have many uses for this particular colour and here it is meant to go under a black undercoat anyway. I applied small amount to certain places, just to add texture.

HOBBY DRILL:

I drilled some holes in different sizes here and there to look like corrosion or some form of acid damage. Easy to do – looks cool once painted.

 

So, there’s that. These are just few ways to enchance Necromunda bases. I bet you can find a lot more ways to differentiate the set. Here’s how mine looks like after the above additions:

Nazroth

TUTORIAL: DIY INFINITY CAMO MARKERS

In this article I would like to present to you an easy way to prepare and then paint your own Camo Markers for Infinity the Game.

I USED:

  • PCV
  • Ruler
  • Pencil
  • Hobby Knife
  • 25mm Bases

 

PREPARATION:

Obviously, the preparation process was pretty simple. Using a ruler, pencil and hobby knife I first drawn and then cut  five 25x47mm rectangles made of PCV. I then glued them on top of 25mm round bases. At this point Camo Markers were ready to get painted.

PAINTING:

1  First step was to undercoat entire Camo Markers with Vallejo's Desert Tan.

2  Next I used a piece of synthetic hair holder as a stencil and airbrushed Vallejo Light Brown over the Markers.

3  Then I switched to Vallejo Earth and airbrushed it over the markers using a piece of net that I got patatoes in. This net should be easily obtainable in every grocery store and makes for a really cool stencil.

4  I then got back to hair holder stencil and airbrushed a layer of Vallejo Light Grey Green.

5  Next I airbrushed points of Vallejo Dark Flesh.

6  Some wet stippling went next. First I applied clumsy dots of Vallejo German Red Brown, then did the same with Games Workshop Pallid Wych Flesh. Afterwards I used Pallid Wych Flesh to mark edges of the markers and provide number to distinguish them from one another on the gaming board.

7  Basing came last. I used Games Workshop Agrellan Earth and Agrellan Badland, then drybrushed them with Karak Stone and Flayed One Flesh. Work done.

Nazroth

TUTORIAL: KEEPING YOUR BRUSHES ALIVE

Ever wandered how a brush graveyard looks like? Some of us seen this wast field of broken, damaged brushes – left aside without purpose. A truly sad sight to behold. Now you’re probably looking at the sharp tip of your favorite brush thinking “It won’t happen to you my dear friend. This doesn’t concern you.” Sorry to be a bringer of bad news, but brushes come and go – no way around it. The only thing we can do is to preserve their longevity as much as possible. How to it? The sole purpose of this article is to share some tips that might help you enjoy your brush till it’s late veteranship and avoid this:

Brush Care:

On top of thorough cleaning after each use, the proper care is the key to preserve brush’s shape and thus function. It’s not something to repeat at daily basis, still every now and then a “brush spa”should be performed. Here’s how I do it:

I USED:

  • Airbrush Cleaner
  • Soap
  • Hair repair conditioner
  • Water
  • Paper Towels
  • Small cup

1  First I poured Airbrush Cleaner into a small cup. Next I dipped a tip of the brush, tapping it against a bottom of the cup. The purpose of this step is to ensure that any dried out paint leftovers would get removed from the brush's tip. Once done I cleaned up the tip and metal part of the brush's handle with a paper towel soaked in Airbrush Cleaner. I did this by slowly pulling the brush through the towel, forming it's tip.

2  Step two was to gently clean the tip with soaped fingers and wash it with water.

3  Then I moved to step three, covering the tip with a hair repair conditioner. Then I left the brush to soak with conditioner for about 20 minutes.

4  The final step was to once again clean the brush with water and form the tip, using a paper towel.

Now my brushes rest happily in a brush cup, smiling to me in wait for next project…

Brush Necromancy:

Ok, so you can take care of your brushes to keep them healthy, but what if they’re already ‘on the other side’? Untill recently I was sure that there’s no comming back from the brush’s afterlife, but I was prooven wrong by a friend who linked me a crazy awesome tutorial – and now I will share it with you.

I USED:

  • Iron (yes, like for Ironing clothes)
  • Water

1  I dipped the brush in water...

2  I touched a wet tip of the brush to the hot iron, then started moving it backwards, gently turning it in one direction.

Well – that’s it! Sounds easy? It actually is XD Just take a look at this video…

 

Nazroth