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TUTORIAL: PAINTING BROWN MILITARY COATS

How about I show you a technique to paint brown military coats like a pro in a way so simple that it’ll make you wander why haven’t you painted like that before? Below is a simple Step-by-step tutorial on how to achieve awesome tattered and used up leather brown coat effect in just few simple steps.

First some home brewed theory.

Stippling: A technique of creating texture out of dozens of tiny dots of paint. Easiest way to achieve this is to use a Stippling Brush (round head, tip cut off – flat surface instead, resilient hair).

Blending: A technique of gently intermingling two or more colors to create a gradual transition or to soften lines. Below I will demonstrate a rather crude version of it.

I USED:

* Stippling Brush (GW),

* Regular Brush,

* Olive Drab (Vallejo AIR),

* Oallid Wych Flesh (GW),

* Strong Tone Ink (AP),

1  You can start painting this on any dark surface, but for good result I recommend to prepare the surface, by following steps 1 to 3 of Painting 'Infinity' Black Tutorial. This will transition into a complex and interresting surface to work on. On a bright side neither these nor following layers require precision and are really fast to paint.

TUTORIAL: PAINTING ‘INFINITY’ BLACK

2  Time to stipple. I used a Stippling brush and Pallid Wych Flesh paint. I left the excess paint on the palette and randomly applied some dots onto the coat.

3  Next I mixed Olive Drab 1:1 with Strong Tone Ink and applied it all over the coat. This is the crude version of blending I mentioned earlier. It has not much to do with actual blending technique, except it changes the color and actually 'blends'.

4  Wash comes last. I applied a strong, wet layer of Strong Tone Ink all over the coat. Once dry - paint job is done.

!  This might be the end to it, but if you preffer to take your paint job to a higher level you can for example 'edge' the coat with a brighter brown/leathery colour. From now on you have a great looking base to add detail to and it was achieved in no time.

TUTORIAL: PAINTING EDGES

Disclaimer:

I will add some pictures of finished models, once I’m through with current project. It might take some time tho, as there’s around 70 of them occupying my dest right now. Stay tuned and revisit this article for an update in few weeks. Cheers!

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Nazroth

PAINTING PHILOSOPHY part three EDGE OF TOMORROW

PROLOGUE:

Third time’s a charm thus welcome to the third ‘Painting Philosophy’ article, where “I let you in on ‘how’ and especially ‘why’ I do some things in a certain way. In my opinion a proper approach to painting is crucial to maintain healthy and rewarding experience. Final result depends on it in the same way as on techniques, know-how and tools used. Nowadays internet is full of painting tutorials yet it takes some inner understanding of our own capabilities to find what suits us best and fully benefit from all acquired knowledge. That being said – In this series I will reveal what works best for me as a painter. I hope you will find some wisdom in it…”

PAINTING PHILOSOPHY: EDGING TECHNIQUE

In last article I wrote a lot about the edge of a base and what it represents. Do not let yourself get fooled by a similar title tho, as today I would like to take a slightly different approach. I introduce to you the ‘Edging technique’. Something that I myself am addicted to since Games Workshop lured me in with their EDGE paints series. Before that I struggled to keep my colours juicy and interresting enough. Kept to dark, murky colour schemes and avoided any type of lining, including edges. That translated into being a bit dissapointed with my own works – so a not very healthy relationship with paints and miniatures. It all changed once I got my hands on GW’s EDGE paints and that was just the first step which made me realize how important strong edges, combined with proper Lining, are.

What it actually does?

Edging, better known as ‘edge highlighting’ is a technique of applying paint to the natural edges of a surface, providing strong contrast and exposing the mentioned surface. I find Edging, combined with Lining, to be a great way to make a colour pop and literally change how an eye can perceive it. It works especially well with multi-layered surfaces of detailed miniatures but should work for you regardless of what miniatures you paint. Here’s an example of Edging being one of key factors to improove a paint job:

Why this method?

I’m not a guy that looks at miniatures through magnifier glass. I mostly paint projects related with gaming and this kind of miniatures should be able to catch an eye while being used. I like my miniatures to pop, to be sharp and  ‘edgy’. To have personality and coherent colour scheme. For me Edging provides all that and more.

How I do it?

First of all, like with most painting methods, I avoid overloading my brush with too much paint. This is very important as too much paint would run down and ruin a crisp, sharp edge. Other than that I try to:

  • Keep the tip of a brush positioned perpendicularly to the line of the edge and drive it along the edge from from one side to the other. This helps to avoid the tip moving off the edge and paint all around it.

  • Hold a brush near the tip. This gives me a lot of control over the tip and it’s movement.

  • Keep the tip of a brush positioned at about 90 degrees to the edge, which usually keeps it from going point forward and leave paint in recesses.

  • Pick a right paint for the job. This is not limited to GW’s EDGE paints only. Any paint that provides enough contrast, works well with a choosen colour and has enough pigment will do.

EXAMPLES:

EPILOGUE:

Now you know how I approach edge highlighting and with this I would like to close third Painting Philosophy article. Please take note that what works for me, might not necessarily work for you – still there are many ways to accomplish certain things – mine is just one of them. I encourage you to leave some feedback. As usual I put a lot of effort into preparing this article, but if it helps at least one painter out there – I consider it a time well spent.

This would be extremely ‘paitnful’… for you.

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Nazroth

PAINTING PHILOSOPHY part two INTO DARKNESS

PROLOGUE:

This is a second installment in the ‘Painting Philosophy’ series in which I let you in on ‘how’ and especially ‘why’ I do some things in a certain way. “In my opinion a proper approach to painting is crucial to maintain healthy and rewarding experience. Final result depends on it in the same way as on techniques, know-how and tools used. Nowadays internet is full of painting tutorials yet it takes some inner understanding of our own capabilities to find what suits us best and fully benefit from all acquired knowledge. That being said – In this series I will reveal what works best for me as a painter. I hope you will find some wisdom in it…”

PAINTING PHILOSOPHY: THE EDGE

The edge, a plastic frontier between a piece of art and the rest of the world. It divides a miniature from the surrounding chaos. It defines the paint job. It underlines the final result of your work, enchancing the visual effect. In short, a properly painted edge of a base will enclose the miniature just like a frame around a painting. Can you imagine a ‘Mona Lisa’ in a dirty styrofoam frame? Well, that’s what I see each time I look upon a picture of awesomely painted miniature on a base, with dirty, unprepared edge. No matter the quality of paint job, a piece of art turns into a kid with chocolate smeared all over it’s face. I just can’t appreciate ‘that’. But is the difference so evident? Don’t take my word for it – see for yourself…

This actually IS the exact same miniature, with the only exception of one base’s edge being covered with a dirty base edge photoshoped from a work in progress picture. But enough about ‘how I feel’ and let’s skip to ‘how I do’. For me there’s only one paint capable of fully POPing a miniature on the battlefield and it’s BLACK!

Why this colour?

In light spectrum black is not even a colour per se, being an ultimate lack of colour instead. In the world of hobby paints black is technically a colour, due to pigments used to create black paint. This particular colour will work with whatever colour scheme you choose for a miniature, enhancing the effect of what’s on the base. It is worth mentioning, that black paint usually surpases other colours when it comes to opacity, therefore it is much easier to provide a smooth, opaque layer using black than most other paints.

How I do it?

I go about it in a simple, oldschool manner – with regular medium sized brush and a good, trusted paint. After testing a lot of different black paints I chose Vallejo 74.602 Negro Surface Primer. It works great both with brush and surface. Usually one layer is all that is needed to fully cover the edge, if not – second one is always enough. This paint leaves a nice, smooth, thick layer, hiding some irregularities that might happen to cover the edge of the base. It is worth pointing out, that the base’s edge is always the last thing I paint, before finishing a project. First I thoroughly clean up my painting space of any project leftovers, then I apply varnish and just then move to painting black edges. This way both Varnish and edges are clear of any dust particles and unwanted stuff that might stick to them.

What if...?

How do I deal with a situation, when a game requires the base to be marked / split or otherwise painted so that the arc of vision or other feature is clearly visible? I preffer to either:

* Use a modelled on-base feature to clearly indicate the direction a miniature is facing,

* Use a marker instead,

When painting a project for someone else I’m sometimes asked to add an ‘arc of sight’ on the base’s edge. If possible I provide small markings to minimize the other colour’s impact on the otherwise black edge. This seems to work pretty well and keeps the initial feel of a miniature being underlined.

 

EPILOGUE:

So here we are, at an end of the second installment in the Painting Philosophy – a series that is meant to ‘infect’ you with some of my hobby ideals. Hope you found this one interresting and helpful.

As usual – I have put a lot of effort into preparing for this article, yet I am sure I missed something important. If you happen to have any questions or suggestions related to it – feel free to hit me with them. Also take note that what works for me, might not necessarily work for you – still there are many ways to accomplish certain things – mine is just one of them.

All right, sweethearts, you’re a team and there’s nothin’ to worry about. We come here, and we gonna conquer, and we gonna paint some, is that understood? That’s what we gonna do, sweethearts, we are going to go and paint some. All right, people, on the ready line! Are ya lean?

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Nazroth

COLOUR RECIPE: NECROMUNDA UNDERHIVE SCENERY

Here are some Colour Recipes for Necromunda scenery pieces from GALLERY: NECROMUNDA UNDERHIVE. Please take note that this is a simple colour scheme, not covering multiple overlapping layers and blends inbetween, that lead to the final product. It is supposed to be used as guidline not a step-by-step.

METAL:

Black Undercoat,

Skavenblight Dinge (GW), *

Gun Metal (AP),

Shining Silver (AP),

Strong Tone Ink (AP),

Shining Silver (AP), l&p

Streaking Grime (AK),

ORANGE’ish elements:

Black Undercoat,

Cavalry Brown (Val), *

Orange Brown (Val), *

Strong Tone Ink (AP),

Orange Brown (Val), stpl

Lugganath Orange (GW), l&p

Streaking Grime (AK), GREEN lights:

Duck Egg Green (Val), *

Light Livery Green (Val), *

Waywatcher Green (GW),

Off White (Val), l&p

Dwarf Flesh (GW),

l&p – lines and points,

p – points,

b – blend,

drbr – drybrush,

flbr – flatbrush,

stpl – stippling,

*Airbrushed (with multiple layers and mixes)

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Nazroth

TUTORIAL: DIY INFINITY CAMO MARKERS

In this article I would like to present to you an easy way to prepare and then paint your own Camo Markers for Infinity the Game.

I USED:

  • PCV
  • Ruler
  • Pencil
  • Hobby Knife
  • 25mm Bases

 

PREPARATION:

Obviously, the preparation process was pretty simple. Using a ruler, pencil and hobby knife I first drawn and then cut  five 25x47mm rectangles made of PCV. I then glued them on top of 25mm round bases. At this point Camo Markers were ready to get painted.

PAINTING:

1  First step was to undercoat entire Camo Markers with Vallejo's Desert Tan.

2  Next I used a piece of synthetic hair holder as a stencil and airbrushed Vallejo Light Brown over the Markers.

3  Then I switched to Vallejo Earth and airbrushed it over the markers using a piece of net that I got patatoes in. This net should be easily obtainable in every grocery store and makes for a really cool stencil.

4  I then got back to hair holder stencil and airbrushed a layer of Vallejo Light Grey Green.

5  Next I airbrushed points of Vallejo Dark Flesh.

6  Some wet stippling went next. First I applied clumsy dots of Vallejo German Red Brown, then did the same with Games Workshop Pallid Wych Flesh. Afterwards I used Pallid Wych Flesh to mark edges of the markers and provide number to distinguish them from one another on the gaming board.

7  Basing came last. I used Games Workshop Agrellan Earth and Agrellan Badland, then drybrushed them with Karak Stone and Flayed One Flesh. Work done.

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Nazroth

COLOUR RECIPES: INFINITY KAZAKS

Here are some Colour Recipes for Infinity Haqqislam from GALLERY: INFINITY KAZAKS lvl 4. Please take note that this is a simple colour scheme, not covering multiple overlapping layers and blends inbetween, that lead to the final product. It is supposed to be used as guidline not a step-by-step.

GREEN armour & uniforms:

Black Undercoat,

Dark Green RLM (Val), *

Interior Green (Val), *

Mix Interior Green (Val) 3:2 Dead Flesh (Val), *

Mix Strong Tone Ink (AP) 1:1 Soft Tone Ink (AP),

Mix Interior Green 1:1:1 Flayed One Flesh (GW) Pale Wych Flesh (GW), l&p

BLACK/GREY outfits & weapons:

Black Undercoat,

Skavenblight Dinge (GW),

Fenrisian Grey (GW),

Pallid Wych Flesh (GW), l&p

Dark Tone Ink (AP),

Pallid Wych Flesh (GW), l&p

White, l&p

BROWN elements:

Olive Drab (Val),

Gorthor Brown (GW),

Mix Gorthor Brown (GW) 1:1 Pallid Wych Flesh (GW), l&p

Mix Strong Tone Ink (AP) 1:1 Soft Tone Ink (AP),

Karak Stone (GW), l&p

SKIN:

Bugmans Glow (GW),

Dwarf Flesh (GW),

Dwarf Flesh (GW) + Pale Flesh (Val),

Mix Strong Tone Ink (AP) 1:1 Soft Tone Ink (AP),

Pale Flesh (Val),

Mix Pale Flesh (Val) 1:1 Pallid Wych Flesh (GW), l&p

l&p – lines and points,

p – points,

b – blend,

drbr – drybrush,

flbr – flatbrush,

*Airbrushed (with multiple layers and mixes)

 

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Nazroth

COLOUR RECIPES: INFINITY NOMADS

Here are some Colour Recipes for Infinity Nomads from GALLERY: INFINITY NOMADS lvl 4-5. Please take note that this is a simple colour scheme, not covering multiple overlapping layers and blends inbetween, that lead to the final product. It is supposed to be used as guidline not a step-by-step.


RED armour:

Black Undercoat,

Sanguine Base (P3),

Wazdakka Red (GW),

Mix Wzdakka Red 2:1 Skeleton Bone (AP),

Mix Wzdakka Red 2:1:1 Skeleton Bone (AP), White, l&p

Strong Tone Ink (AP),

Mix Skeleton Bone 1:1 White, l&p

Red Tone Ink (AP),

Red Tone Ink (AP),

nomad wip
BLACK/GREY outfits:

Black Undercoat,

Skavenblight Dinge (GW),

Mix Skavenblight Dinge (GW) 1:1 Administratum Grey (GW),

Mix: Administratum Grey 2:1 Fenrisian Grey (GW),

Mix: Administratum Grey 2:1:1 Fenrisian Grey (GW), Pale Wych Flesh (GW), l&p

Pale Wych Flesh (GW), l&p

Dark Tone Ink (AP),

Pale Wych Flesh (GW), l&p

WEAPONS:

Skavenblight Dinge (GW),

Mix Skavenblight Dinge (GW) 1:1 Administratum Grey (GW),

Mix Administratum Grey 1:1 Flayed One Flesh (GW),

Mix Administratum Grey 1:1: Flayed One Flesh, Pale Wych Flesh (GW), l&p

Mix Strong Tone Ink (AP) 1:1 Soft Tone Ink (AP),

Flayed One Flesh (GW), l&p

Pale Wych Flesh (GW), l&p

SKIN:

Bugmans Glow (GW),

Dwarf Flesh (GW),

Dwarf Flesh (GW) + Pale Flesh (Vallejo),

Mix Strong Tone Ink (AP) 1:1 Soft Tone Ink (AP),

Pale Flesh (Vallejo),

Pale Flesh (Vallejo) + Pallid Wych Flesh (GW) l&p,

 

WHITE helmets:

TUTORIAL: PAINTING WHITE

BLACK metal:

TUTORIAL: PAINTING ‘INFINITY BLACK’

l&p – lines and points,

p – points,

b – blend,

drbr – drybrush,

flbr – flatbrush,

*Airbrushed (with multiple layers and mixes)

Zapisz

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Nazroth

PAINTING PHILOSOPHY part one PAIN(T) TRAIN

PROLOGUE:

I decided to start this new ‘Painting Philosophy’ series to let you in on ‘how’ and especially ‘why’ I do some things in a certain way. In my opinion a proper approach to painting is crucial to maintain healthy and rewarding experience. Final result depends on it in the same way as on techniques, know-how and tools used. Nowadays  internet is full of painting tutorials yet it takes some inner understanding of our own capabilities to find what suits us best and fully benefit from all acquired knowledge. That being said – In this series I will reveal what works best for me as a painter. I hope you will find some wisdom in it…

PAINTING PHILOSOPHY: PAINTING IN GROUPS

Painting in groups is a term that I use to describe painting entire groups of miniatures, usually one layer at a time. There are many different approaches to painting miniatures. Some painters preffer to paint a single miniature from start to finish, one layer at a time. Others avoid painting by layers and instead paint a single piece of a miniature, applying all the colours, before proceeding to next part. I on the other hand, feel most comfortable when painting groups of miniatures. The size of such groups migh varry between six to about fifty pieces at a time. They don’t even need to follow the exact same colour scheme as long as they share majority of layers. Off course this method is reserved for armies and collections and would not benefit a single miniature project.

Why this method?

After years of practice this method triggered somehow remotely. I love painting miniatures but get really excited once projects enter final stages. I’m really hooked up on that feeling of accomplishment. That’s why I like to plan projects so that by not undertaking unnecesary actions I save time. If I have a bunch of miniatures to get painted I’d rather prepare and undercoat them all in one go, instead of repeating this for every single miniature, one at a time. It not only quickens the process but also leaves a ‘not entirely fun’ part, of a project, behind. It is not limited to undercoat only and instead translates to all the layers. Every accomplished layer brings me a bit closer to the final steps of a project – the place where ‘choirs’ are left behind, most stuff looks pretty cool already and there’s most fun for me to have.

How do I manage not to get bored?

I maintain my motivation by making small, but important steps. My main goal is to accomplish a project, but there are many small targets to achieve between the start and the finish line. I set obtainable targets, then once accomplished I check if I have energy for another round. Never force myself to take more than one step at a time – this one is important, but all the rest is just a bonus, and as mentioned before – each step brings me closer to project’s completion. In practice it might look more or less like this:

USARIADNA lvl 4 ‘Chrome & Shiny’ COLOUR RECIPE

START

step: Black Undercoat,

MAIN STEP COMPLETE

DESERT Armour & Uniforms:

step: Airbrushed layers (main colour), Dark Earth (Vallejo),

step: Airbrushed layers (main colour), Light Brown (Vallejo),

step: Highlights on the main colour, Light Brown (Vallejo),

step: Wash, Mix Strong Tone Ink (AP) 1:1 Soft Tone Ink (AP),

MAIN STEP COMPLETE

step: Edges on the main colour, Flayed One Flesh (GW),

step: Edges on the main colour, Pallid Wych Flesh (GW),

MAIN STEP COMPLETE

BROWN elements:

step: Secondary colour layer, Olive Drab (Vallejo),

step: Secondary colour layer, Gorthor Brown (GW),

step: Secondary colour layer, Gorthor Brown (GW) + Pallid Wych Flesh (GW),

step: Secondary colour Wash, Mix Strong Tone Ink (AP) 1:1 Soft Tone Ink (AP),

MAIN STEP COMPLETE

step: Edges on the secondary colour, Karak Stone (GW),

MAIN STEP COMPLETE

BLACK/GREY outfits & weapons:

step: Secondary colour layer, Skavenblight Dinge (GW),

step: Secondary colour layer, Fenrisian Grey (GW),

step: Secondary colour layer, Pallid Wych Flesh (GW),

step: Secondary colour Wash, Dark Tone Ink (AP),

MAIN STEP COMPLETE

step: Edges on the secondary colour, Pallid Wych Flesh (GW),

step: Edges on the secondary colour, White,

MAIN STEP COMPLETE

SKIN:

step: Secondary colour layer, Bugmans Glow (GW),

step: Secondary colour layer, Dwarf Flesh (GW),

step: Secondary colour layer, Dwarf Flesh (GW) + Pale Flesh (Vallejo),

step: Secondary colour layer, Pale Flesh (Vallejo),

step: Secondary colour Wash, Mix Strong Tone Ink (AP) 1:1 Soft Tone Ink (AP),

MAIN STEP COMPLETE

step: Edges on the secondary colour, Pale Flesh (Vallejo) + Pallid Wych Flesh (GW),

MAIN STEP COMPLETE

OTHER COLOURS…

step: Tetriary colours…

etc…

MAIN STEP COMPLETE

VARNISH:

step: Applying Varnihs,

MAIN STEP COMPLETE

BASES:

step: Modelling bases,

step: Painting bases,

step: Painting base edges,

MAIN STEP COMPLETE

step: Applying tufts and additional elements to the bases…

COMPLETION

As you can see there are approximately thirty steps required to accomplish this project so if I manage to take one step every day I will finish the project in about a month. Let’s say there are just six miniatures in the entire project. Would it be so difficult to accomplish one step with six miniatures in one day? How long can it actually take? It is not some extremely difficult, time consuming task. Easy to motivate myself to do that. Now let’s say I had a free wekend and managed to accomplish a MAIN STEP instead.  This is worth between two to five regular steps. Let’s say I took out five. I just moved five days ahead of schedule. Can spend them being lazy or move to another step… and there’s that – this is how the process works for me.

Other benefits...

Coherent Colour Scheme – Painting in groups, one layer at a time, translates to a more coherent colour scheme. No need to mix paints between miniatures and try to achieve same exact tones – paint is prepared for entire group and will look exactly the same between first and last miniature. In the end this will provide a nice, coherent look of the entire project.

Understanding Through Repetition – After few miniatures of the same kind muscles get used to the detail naturally. Instead of interpretting every miniature I can follow a sort of ‘programmed muscle memory’ to paint much more efficiently, and thus faster. Quality also benefits from this, as there are no ‘uncertain’ brush strokes.

Reaching Ultimate Concentration – Repetition allows me to find myself in a state of utter concentration that won’t get disturbed by music or audio book, still lets me appreciate and take in anything that plays in the background, including videos. I know it’s not a super-power level state of mind and it is common among painters, still not being forced to reset every time and then to mix paints or plan the paint job helps to lenghten the ‘in the mood’ periods.

Purity of Purpose – With clear, obtainable targets in reach and a plan layed down before me it is easier for me to move forward, each step taken being deduced from the list. This makes my motivation thrive.

EPILOGUE:

If you read through all of this banter – I hereby deem you worthy! With wisdom I bestowed, You have possessed knowledge necessary to use the Multi-Miniature Ninja Painter technique. Use it wisely and with good intent and it will benefit you greatly. Do not fear to step in and teach other ‘Muggles’ some of that magic.

I have put a lot of effort into preparing for this article, yet I am sure I missed something important. If you happen to have any questions related to it – feel free to hit me with them. Also take note that what works for me, might not necessarily work for you – still there are many ways to accomplish certain things – mine is just one of them.

What is best in life?

Paint miniatures,

See them displayed before you,

And hear the appraisal from others,

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Nazroth

TUTORIAL: PAINTING ‘INFINITY’ BLACK

There’s probably as many recipes for painting black as there are painters all over the globe. On top of that there are many diffetrent  techniques to choose from. Painting a lot of detailed Infinity the Game miniatures, I have found one that works best for me. Today I would like to present to you a ‘Five Layers Technique‘ based colour scheme that I myself use.

First of all some home brewed theory. Just like most colours – Black looks great when highlighted. Black surfaces make good impression, when we are able to see different overlaping layers and how colour works with natural curves and detail. For this purpose I always use grey to highlight and texturize black. This leads to black effectively turning grey in the end, so I usually wash it with black ink/wash to deepen the ‘blackness’ in recesses and darken flat surfaces. That in turn lessens the highlights and flattens the entire impression. Here’s where I figured to follow wash with an edge of white’ish colour to produce strong contrast and ‘pop’ the blackness.

I USED:

* Chaos Black Undercoat (GW),

* Skavenblight Dinge (GW),

* Fenrisian Grey (GW),

* Oallid Wych Flesh (GW),

* Dark Tone Ink (AP),

!  Important note: For this technique you don't need to re-paint entire surface with pure black. I use it on different, mixed colours - usually being previously airbrushed all over the miniature.

1  First I covered the entire target surface with Skavenblight Dinge. To fasten and ease the process I added a bit of watter to the paint. No need to cover everything with a strong layer - just smoother what's undeneath it with a nice dark grey.

2  Then I made some random strokes with Fenrisian Grey. Once again I dilluted the paint a bit, to make it more transparent. This layer provides texture and some irregularities to all the flat surfaces.

3  I then edged with Pallid Wych Flesh. I tend to edge only the natural sharp edges and some easy accessible spots. the most important are the ones on top of the surface I paint. Added some random scratches here and there too.

4  I then washed the entire thing black with AP's Dark tone Ink. (no picture)

5  Finally I edged once again with Pallid Wych Flesh. Added some more scratches. Job done.

That is the entire secret behing my Painting ‘Infinity’ Black technique. Fast and easy. Sure, no perfectly smooth transitions, no none metallic metal, but still a very rewarding result. With a bit of imagination and practice – this might be used as a perfect starting point for a much more complicated paint job. Hope it works for you.

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Nazroth

COLOUR RECIPES: INFINITY HAQQISLAM

Here are some Colour Recipes for Infinity Haqqislam from GALLERY: INFINITY HAQQISLAM lvl 4. Please take note that this is a simple colour scheme, not covering multiple overlapping layers and blends inbetween, that lead to the final product. It is supposed to be used as guidline not a step-by-step.

SANDY armour:

Black Undercoat,

Light Brown (VAL),*

Bonewhite (Val),*

White, l&p

Soft Tone Ink (AP),

 

RED elements:

Sanguine Base (P3),

Mephiston Red (GW),

Evil Sunz Scarlet (GW),

Troll Slayer Orange (GW), l&p

Fire Dragon Broght (GW), l&p

GREEN lights:

Sick Green (VAL),

Escorpena Green (VAL),

MIX: Escorpena Green (VAL) 1:1 Off White (VAL), l&p

Waywatcher Green (GW), glaze

Light Livery green (VAL), blend

 

WHITE elements:

‘Sandy Armour’ base,

Pallid Wych Flesh (GW),

White,

White, corrections

BROWN elements:

‘Sandy Armour’ base,

Off White (VAL), l&p

Dark Fleshtone (VAL),

MIX: Mix Strong Tone Ink (AP) 1:1 Soft Tone Ink (AP),

l&p – lines and points,

p – points,

b – blend,

drbr – drybrush,

flbr – flatbrush,

*Airbrushed (with multiple layers and mixes)

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