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Tag Archives: No Airbrush

TUTORIAL: PAINTING SKIN (BASIC)

Painting skin – nightmare for some, EZ for others. Back in the days I’ve struggled with a proper skin tone, my miniatures turning out too dark, or skin being overall flat and uninterresting. Practicing ‘Five Layers Technique‘ for many years, led me to some realisations and now I am able to present to you my ultimate way of basic skin painting.

I USED:

* Regular Brush,

* Bugmans Glow (GW),

* Dwarf Flesh (GW),

* Flesh (Val AIR),

* Strong Tone Ink (AP),

* Soft Tone Ink (AP),

* Pale Flesh (Val),

!  You can achieve similar results using different paints and avoiding mixes, as long as you follow Five Layers Technique basics. For example Bugmans Glow (GW) might be switched for Tanned Flesh (AP) or Tan (Vallejo).

!  You can start by applying first layer on any surface. This method does not require any special preparation, like re-painting surface to primer black etc.

1  I started by applying an underlayer of Bugmans Glow paint over any surface destined to become skin. This layer might be a bit messy and is not meant to be smooth, only to cover entire surface. For this particular layer I encourage thinning the paint a bit to help it flow into recesses.

2  Next I applied a main layer of Dwarf Flesh. This time I tried to keep paint from flowing into recesses and made sure that it will cover all big flat areas.

3  I then applied a layer made of a 1:1 mix of Dwarf Flesh and Flesh over all raised areas. This is suposed to be the first highligh and provides a difference in skin tones over the model. Don't worry if some piant flows into recesses, just try to avoid covering everything with it.

4  Here came the flood of wash. I applied a 1:1 mix of Army Painter's Strong Tone Ink with Soft Tone Ink. As usual I didn't bother to be subtle about it.

5  Once dried, I highlighted skin with a 1:1 mix of Elf Skintone and Pale Flesh. This usually is the final highlight and is meant to POP the skin.

!  If I was to enchance skin a bit and move forward from this point, I would add points of focus with lines and dots of Pale Flesh. Some deeper spots can also be in-lined with Flesh Tone or some brown-ish wash to build contrast but that's for another article.

Nazroth

TUTORIAL: PAINTING BROWN MILITARY COATS

How about I show you a technique to paint brown military coats like a pro in a way so simple that it’ll make you wander why haven’t you painted like that before? Below is a simple Step-by-step tutorial on how to achieve awesome tattered and used up leather brown coat effect in just few simple steps.

First some home brewed theory.

Stippling: A technique of creating texture out of dozens of tiny dots of paint. Easiest way to achieve this is to use a Stippling Brush (round head, tip cut off – flat surface instead, resilient hair).

Blending: A technique of gently intermingling two or more colors to create a gradual transition or to soften lines. Below I will demonstrate a rather crude version of it.

I USED:

* Stippling Brush (GW),

* Regular Brush,

* Olive Drab (Vallejo AIR),

* Pallid Wych Flesh (GW),

* Strong Tone Ink (AP),

1  You can start painting this on any dark surface, but for good result I recommend to prepare the surface, by following steps 1 to 3 of Painting 'Infinity' Black Tutorial. This will transition into a complex and interresting surface to work on. On a bright side neither these nor following layers require precision and are really fast to paint.

TUTORIAL: PAINTING ‘INFINITY’ BLACK

2  Time to stipple. I used a Stippling brush and Pallid Wych Flesh paint. I left the excess paint on the palette and randomly applied some dots onto the coat.

3  Next I mixed Olive Drab 1:1 with Strong Tone Ink and applied it all over the coat. This is the crude version of blending I mentioned earlier. It has not much to do with actual blending technique, except it changes the color and actually 'blends'.

4  Wash comes last. I applied a strong, wet layer of Strong Tone Ink all over the coat. Once dry - paint job is done.

!  This might be the end to it, but if you preffer to take your paint job to a higher level you can for example 'edge' the coat with a brighter brown/leathery colour. From now on you have a great looking base to add detail to and it was achieved in no time.

TUTORIAL: PAINTING EDGES

 

Nazroth
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