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Monthly Archives:February 2018

The Scarhandpainting of War

Thus we may know that there are five essentials for miniatures painting:
He will paint who knows when to paint and when not to paint.
He will paint who knows how to handle both superior and inferior brushes.
He will paint whose paints are mixed on the same palette throughout entire project.
He will paint who, prepared himself, waits to take the project undercoated.
He will paint who has hobby capacity and is not interfered with by the customer.

If you know the miniature and know your paints, you need not fear the result of a hundred paint jobs.

Remember Fifty Shades of Scarhandpainting? Well, it was published an uncountable number of hobby hours and over a thousand painted miniatures ago. Yes – today is my dear Scarhandpainting.com’s second anniversary and guess what – I totally forgot to get myself a present. At least you guys remembered and prepared a fantastic surprise for me: over 220000 visits from more than 90000 different IP’s throughout the year. That literally doubled last year’s results. I’m very excited to see how popular this site is. For me this is the best reward for all the effort put into expanding Blog’s content. It is insane that so many people visit my humble site and for that I thank all of you. Cheers!

THE FIGHT CONTINUES

Last twelve months were like a constant extatic frenzy of painting new, awesome projects, meeting fantastic people from around the world and hobbying all night long! Must say that this way of life suits me well, creating a variety of means to express myself through hobby. It brings me joy to interact with great people and see how they implement my ideas into their own projects. Sharing projects with an audience keeps me hyped and motivated, while providing tips and advice through hobby related articles helps me focus and grow as a painter. That’s why I plan to continue on a quest to bring even more projects and articles to life.

YEAR OF CHALLENGES

Looking at all these pictures I can’t help myself but feel satisfied. I’ve painted an entire spectrum of crazy awesome stuff from among both games I love and games I haven’t even heard of before. Some of these have really challenged my skill to the limits, while others felt like visiting a good old friend. If this is how next twelve months would look like then count me in!

At this point I would like to thank all of my friendstomers, without whom this fantastic trip wouldn’t be possible. I appreciate your support, all the hobby chatter and trust you bestowed upon me.

Special thanks to Andreas, Thomas, Jek and Behemoth. I am honoured with your trust and friendship. You have my axe, my bow and my brush!

THE BEST OF

The number of articles grew exponentially since first anniversary. Below is a list of articles that you found most interresting throughout last twelve months (ordered at random).

TUTORIAL: PHOTOGRAPHIC SETUP

TUTORIAL: INFINITY DIY CONSOLE

TUTORIAL: PAINTING ‘INFINITY’ BLACK

TUTORIAL: PAINTING MARBLE

TUTORIAL: PAINTING NOMAD RED ARMOUR

TUTORIAL: INFINITY ‘DO IT YOURSELF’ GAMING TERRAIN

COLOUR RECIPES: FALLEN FRONTIERS RIFFS

TUTORIAL: PAINTING MICRO ART STUDIO CONCRETE WALLS

REVIEW: ARMY PAINTER TUFTS

COLOUR RECIPES: INFINITY USARF

REVIEW: CORAX WHITE SPRAY

PAINTING PHILOSOPHY part three EDGE OF TOMORROW

WITNESS ME!

With two sharp brushes in hands, chest wet from dripping paint and fierce warcry on my twisted lips I urge you to ‘Witness Me!’ as I face another year of insanely cool projects! What lays ahead cannot be described with simple words. Follow me and see for yourself!

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Nazroth

REVIEW: PROSHAKER

Have you ever woke up after a day of painting, hands searing with agony? Do you shake your paints yourself or use futuristic technology to do it for you? Now in all seriousness – have you ever considered getting a proper paint shaker? I have recently decided to treat myself with one. Below are my thoughts about it…

PROSHAKER

So yeah – Recently I’ve obtained a ProShaker – Professional Gel Polish and Lacquer Shaker. Before I chose this model I’ve made a short research in the web and compared it with two other popular, hobby friendly shakers: Nadeco Nail Lacquer Shaker and Robart Hobby Paint Shaker. Don’t know much about the company that produces ProShaker but it looked impressive and durable when compared to other two. It also operates at a wider spectrum of movement so I’ve figured it will provide better results. Purchased via AliExpress, got here in (wow!) just four days and so far I am happy about it, but first things first.

INSIDE THE BOX

Inside the box there are:

* Liquid Shaker’s main body, wraped in a double cardboard casing,

* Power plug,

* Spare springs,

* Quick start manual,

QUALITY

Made mostly out of hard, lacquered metal, with sturdy plastic parts and mechanism hidden in a special compartment – ProShaker seems to be of a good quality and durable. It’s simplicity wotks as an advantage as there are not many parts that can get damaged. The main body is very heavy (seems like about 5kg) and holds in place while working. Power plug is a standard issue, nothing special – it can be easily replaced if broken. I’m not especially fond of a on/off switch, would preffer a more solid, plastic button – but this one does it’s job so I’ll give it a free pass.

PERFORMANCE

ProShaker is very simple to use – just put a paint into the holder and cap it, switch on, wait 60 seconds till it automatically switches off. The holder works fine with Army Painter, Vallejo, Games Workshop and even P3 bottles. Advertised to perform with about 500 rotations per minute – In my opinion it seems more like 4 per second, which gives about half the declared speed – still quite good.

One thing that I find unpleasant about ProShaker’s performance is the noise. It has nothing to do with ‘Smooth, quiet operation’ proudly displayed on the box – and is rather annoying. This might be because I have a brand new piece and it’ll take some time before it lubricates properly. If not – I will use a special spray grease and it should tone the noise down a notch.

Once ‘shaked’ the paint is mixed pretty well. ProShaker managed to effectively mix even a Games Workshop’s ‘dry’ paint, which is a deed in itself. It works especially well with paints that have a pigmentation issue – something that requires a lot of work to properly mix.

PRICE and COMPETITION

ProShaker is an expensive toy. Prices varry between 90$ and up to 170$. Add to it a shipment cost and potential customs and damn – this thing is not for everyone. Still, the quality seems worth it, especially when compared to competition.

From what I’ve seen there are two major competitors to ProShaker, that provide similar results.

Nadeco Nail Lacquer Shaker

It comes in many variations. Price between 20$ and 40$ is certainly a big advantage over a ProShaker, but the quality is clearly inferior. Type of movement is limited to left-right vibration.

 

Robart Hobby Paint Shaker

This seems to be the same thing as the one above, altho it is nicely reskined and priced over 40$ and up to 70$. Casing looks way better than Nadeco, but I couldn;t find any information about the material it is made of. This one is based in the USA so it’s way more expensive for poor folks in the EU due to customs – have that in mind.

IS IT FOR ME?

Assuming price not being an issue, the question you should ask yourself when considering such a toy is – would it really be optimal for you. It’s nothing more but pure economy of work. In my line of work I simply do not have time to ‘masturbate’ my paints, looking outside the window all day long. Time is of an essence, not to mention hands fatigue – I’d rather paint. On top of that there are results, which in case of some types of paints are impressive. So – there’s that.

WHAT TO LOOK OUT FOR?

One important thing that comes to mind is the power plug. I have seen over a dozen AliExpress and Ebay offers, where there was no choice nor information as to what type of a power plug is in the box. In the end I purchased from a seller that provided a choice between EU/UK/US power plug – but be advised to check this out before getting one yourself.

SUMMARY

After using ProShaker throughout entire day of painting I’d say I am pretty happy with my new toy. Yes, price is an overkill and that goes for every shaker mentioned in the article, but like most lasting professional hobby tools – this is a once in a lifetime purchase. From now on I can spend more time with miniatures and less time shaking paints. If I was to tag this purchase on a scale where 10 is life changing, 8 is good, 6 is ok, 5 is mediocre, 3 is bad and I don’t want to even mention 1 – taking quality, price and performance into consideration – I would settle for a 7. That’s because I was expecting a bit more with some particular paints, but also got good results with most of them. Let’s just say – money well spent.

Agree/Disagree? There’s a comment section below where you can stand for your opinion 😉

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Nazroth

January 2018

‘I’m blue da ba dee da ba daa’ – and that’s more or less how I spent January. Two projects, both Infinity the Game related, in a similar colour scheme. One pretty small, yet important, being an extension to Panoceania ‘Chrome & Shiny’ collection, the other grand and marvelous – Neoterra ‘Witness Me!’ – that I wasn’t able to finish in just one month, so expect more of these blue dudesmen to follow soon. Now it is official – I am a real life Panoceania artificer 😛

Infinity NEOTERRA ‘Witness Me!’ – View gallery…

Infinity PANOCEANIA ‘Chrome & Shiny’ – View gallery…

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TUTORIAL: PAINTING BROWN MILITARY COATS

How about I show you a technique to paint brown military coats like a pro in a way so simple that it’ll make you wander why haven’t you painted like that before? Below is a simple Step-by-step tutorial on how to achieve awesome tattered and used up leather brown coat effect in just few simple steps.

First some home brewed theory.

Stippling: A technique of creating texture out of dozens of tiny dots of paint. Easiest way to achieve this is to use a Stippling Brush (round head, tip cut off – flat surface instead, resilient hair).

Blending: A technique of gently intermingling two or more colors to create a gradual transition or to soften lines. Below I will demonstrate a rather crude version of it.

I USED:

* Stippling Brush (GW),

* Regular Brush,

* Olive Drab (Vallejo AIR),

* Oallid Wych Flesh (GW),

* Strong Tone Ink (AP),

1  You can start painting this on any dark surface, but for good result I recommend to prepare the surface, by following steps 1 to 3 of Painting 'Infinity' Black Tutorial. This will transition into a complex and interresting surface to work on. On a bright side neither these nor following layers require precision and are really fast to paint.

TUTORIAL: PAINTING ‘INFINITY’ BLACK

2  Time to stipple. I used a Stippling brush and Pallid Wych Flesh paint. I left the excess paint on the palette and randomly applied some dots onto the coat.

3  Next I mixed Olive Drab 1:1 with Strong Tone Ink and applied it all over the coat. This is the crude version of blending I mentioned earlier. It has not much to do with actual blending technique, except it changes the color and actually 'blends'.

4  Wash comes last. I applied a strong, wet layer of Strong Tone Ink all over the coat. Once dry - paint job is done.

!  This might be the end to it, but if you preffer to take your paint job to a higher level you can for example 'edge' the coat with a brighter brown/leathery colour. From now on you have a great looking base to add detail to and it was achieved in no time.

TUTORIAL: PAINTING EDGES

 

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PAINTING PHILOSOPHY part three EDGE OF TOMORROW

PROLOGUE:

Third time’s a charm thus welcome to the third ‘Painting Philosophy’ article, where “I let you in on ‘how’ and especially ‘why’ I do some things in a certain way. In my opinion a proper approach to painting is crucial to maintain healthy and rewarding experience. Final result depends on it in the same way as on techniques, know-how and tools used. Nowadays internet is full of painting tutorials yet it takes some inner understanding of our own capabilities to find what suits us best and fully benefit from all acquired knowledge. That being said – In this series I will reveal what works best for me as a painter. I hope you will find some wisdom in it…”

PAINTING PHILOSOPHY: EDGING TECHNIQUE

In last article I wrote a lot about the edge of a base and what it represents. Do not let yourself get fooled by a similar title tho, as today I would like to take a slightly different approach. I introduce to you the ‘Edging technique’. Something that I myself am addicted to since Games Workshop lured me in with their EDGE paints series. Before that I struggled to keep my colours juicy and interresting enough. Kept to dark, murky colour schemes and avoided any type of lining, including edges. That translated into being a bit dissapointed with my own works – so a not very healthy relationship with paints and miniatures. It all changed once I got my hands on GW’s EDGE paints and that was just the first step which made me realize how important strong edges, combined with proper Lining, are.

What it actually does?

Edging, better known as ‘edge highlighting’ is a technique of applying paint to the natural edges of a surface, providing strong contrast and exposing the mentioned surface. I find Edging, combined with Lining, to be a great way to make a colour pop and literally change how an eye can perceive it. It works especially well with multi-layered surfaces of detailed miniatures but should work for you regardless of what miniatures you paint. Here’s an example of Edging being one of key factors to improove a paint job:

Why this method?

I’m not a guy that looks at miniatures through magnifier glass. I mostly paint projects related with gaming and this kind of miniatures should be able to catch an eye while being used. I like my miniatures to pop, to be sharp and  ‘edgy’. To have personality and coherent colour scheme. For me Edging provides all that and more.

How I do it?

First of all, like with most painting methods, I avoid overloading my brush with too much paint. This is very important as too much paint would run down and ruin a crisp, sharp edge. Other than that I try to:

  • Keep the tip of a brush positioned perpendicularly to the line of the edge and drive it along the edge from from one side to the other. This helps to avoid the tip moving off the edge and paint all around it.

  • Hold a brush near the tip. This gives me a lot of control over the tip and it’s movement.

  • Keep the tip of a brush positioned at about 90 degrees to the edge, which usually keeps it from going point forward and leave paint in recesses.

  • Pick a right paint for the job. This is not limited to GW’s EDGE paints only. Any paint that provides enough contrast, works well with a choosen colour and has enough pigment will do.

EXAMPLES:

EPILOGUE:

Now you know how I approach edge highlighting and with this I would like to close third Painting Philosophy article. Please take note that what works for me, might not necessarily work for you – still there are many ways to accomplish certain things – mine is just one of them. I encourage you to leave some feedback. As usual I put a lot of effort into preparing this article, but if it helps at least one painter out there – I consider it a time well spent.

This would be extremely ‘paitnful’… for you.

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Nazroth

December 2017

December, a month that I’ve learned to treat like a 100% free time chillout, lazy PC gaming and family meetings. I had no hobby plans for December whatsoever. Still some projects got accomplished, being: Necromunda: Underhive collection and a small addition to Gingermane.eu’s Haqqislam force. Was this a lot? Difficult to tell, cause both projects were definitely challenging. Good way to close the year – that’s for sure 🙂

NECROMUNDA: UNDERHIVE – View gallery…

Infinity HAQQISLAM ‘Chrome & Shiny’ – View gallery…

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PAINTING PHILOSOPHY part two INTO DARKNESS

PROLOGUE:

This is a second installment in the ‘Painting Philosophy’ series in which I let you in on ‘how’ and especially ‘why’ I do some things in a certain way. “In my opinion a proper approach to painting is crucial to maintain healthy and rewarding experience. Final result depends on it in the same way as on techniques, know-how and tools used. Nowadays internet is full of painting tutorials yet it takes some inner understanding of our own capabilities to find what suits us best and fully benefit from all acquired knowledge. That being said – In this series I will reveal what works best for me as a painter. I hope you will find some wisdom in it…”

PAINTING PHILOSOPHY: THE EDGE

The edge, a plastic frontier between a piece of art and the rest of the world. It divides a miniature from the surrounding chaos. It defines the paint job. It underlines the final result of your work, enchancing the visual effect. In short, a properly painted edge of a base will enclose the miniature just like a frame around a painting. Can you imagine a ‘Mona Lisa’ in a dirty styrofoam frame? Well, that’s what I see each time I look upon a picture of awesomely painted miniature on a base, with dirty, unprepared edge. No matter the quality of paint job, a piece of art turns into a kid with chocolate smeared all over it’s face. I just can’t appreciate ‘that’. But is the difference so evident? Don’t take my word for it – see for yourself…

This actually IS the exact same miniature, with the only exception of one base’s edge being covered with a dirty base edge photoshoped from a work in progress picture. But enough about ‘how I feel’ and let’s skip to ‘how I do’. For me there’s only one paint capable of fully POPing a miniature on the battlefield and it’s BLACK!

Why this colour?

In light spectrum black is not even a colour per se, being an ultimate lack of colour instead. In the world of hobby paints black is technically a colour, due to pigments used to create black paint. This particular colour will work with whatever colour scheme you choose for a miniature, enhancing the effect of what’s on the base. It is worth mentioning, that black paint usually surpases other colours when it comes to opacity, therefore it is much easier to provide a smooth, opaque layer using black than most other paints.

How I do it?

I go about it in a simple, oldschool manner – with regular medium sized brush and a good, trusted paint. After testing a lot of different black paints I chose Vallejo 74.602 Negro Surface Primer. It works great both with brush and surface. Usually one layer is all that is needed to fully cover the edge, if not – second one is always enough. This paint leaves a nice, smooth, thick layer, hiding some irregularities that might happen to cover the edge of the base. It is worth pointing out, that the base’s edge is always the last thing I paint, before finishing a project. First I thoroughly clean up my painting space of any project leftovers, then I apply varnish and just then move to painting black edges. This way both Varnish and edges are clear of any dust particles and unwanted stuff that might stick to them.

What if...?

How do I deal with a situation, when a game requires the base to be marked / split or otherwise painted so that the arc of vision or other feature is clearly visible? I preffer to either:

* Use a modelled on-base feature to clearly indicate the direction a miniature is facing,

* Use a marker instead,

When painting a project for someone else I’m sometimes asked to add an ‘arc of sight’ on the base’s edge. If possible I provide small markings to minimize the other colour’s impact on the otherwise black edge. This seems to work pretty well and keeps the initial feel of a miniature being underlined.

 

EPILOGUE:

So here we are, at an end of the second installment in the Painting Philosophy – a series that is meant to ‘infect’ you with some of my hobby ideals. Hope you found this one interresting and helpful.

As usual – I have put a lot of effort into preparing for this article, yet I am sure I missed something important. If you happen to have any questions or suggestions related to it – feel free to hit me with them. Also take note that what works for me, might not necessarily work for you – still there are many ways to accomplish certain things – mine is just one of them.

All right, sweethearts, you’re a team and there’s nothin’ to worry about. We come here, and we gonna conquer, and we gonna paint some, is that understood? That’s what we gonna do, sweethearts, we are going to go and paint some. All right, people, on the ready line! Are ya lean?

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Nazroth

COLOUR RECIPE: NECROMUNDA UNDERHIVE SCENERY

Here are some Colour Recipes for Necromunda scenery pieces from GALLERY: NECROMUNDA UNDERHIVE. Please take note that this is a simple colour scheme, not covering multiple overlapping layers and blends inbetween, that lead to the final product. It is supposed to be used as guidline not a step-by-step.

METAL:

Black Undercoat,

Skavenblight Dinge (GW), *

Gun Metal (AP),

Shining Silver (AP),

Strong Tone Ink (AP),

Shining Silver (AP), l&p

Streaking Grime (AK),

ORANGE’ish elements:

Black Undercoat,

Cavalry Brown (Val), *

Orange Brown (Val), *

Strong Tone Ink (AP),

Orange Brown (Val), stpl

Lugganath Orange (GW), l&p

Streaking Grime (AK), GREEN lights:

Duck Egg Green (Val), *

Light Livery Green (Val), *

Waywatcher Green (GW),

Off White (Val), l&p

Dwarf Flesh (GW),

l&p – lines and points,

p – points,

b – blend,

drbr – drybrush,

flbr – flatbrush,

stpl – stippling,

*Airbrushed (with multiple layers and mixes)

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TUTORIAL: ENHANCING NECROMUNDA BASES

Necromunda: Underhive is a game full of nicely detailed plastic miniatures. As much as I hate endorsing Games Workshop – It should be mentioned that in terms of miniatures – they did a really nice job, extending the set so that it includes 25 industrial themed plastic bases. I appreciate this move from GW, even tho the variety of Necromunda bases designs is scarce. For example my own set came with just two versions among a total of ten bases. This is where I come in with a Tutorial on how to Enchance Necromunda bases in a fast, simple way. Below you will find few ideas on how to do it – but let me say this in advance: keep an open mind cause there’s plenty of awesome stuff that can be used to differentiate your Necromunda bases set (and actually any Industrial bases).

I USED:

  • Hobby Knife,
  • Scissors,
  • Plastic Cutter,
  • Hobby Drill,
  • Super Glue,
  • Brass Mesh,
  • Brass Chain,
  • PCV,
  • Games Workshop bitz,
  • Games Workshop skulls,
  • Astrogranite Debris Texture Paint,

 

BRASS MESH:

This stuff can be found in most modellers hobby stores. Personally I love it, cause it let’s me add awesome texture to the bases. It is very easy to use. I tend to cut a piece of mesh with scissors and glue it onto a designated surface, leaving an excess to hang outside the base. Once Super Glue dries out I just cut the excess mesh with scissors and file it on the edge – driving a file from top to bottom of the bases edge. This keeps the mesh glued onto the base, but smoothers the edge nicely.

BRASS CHAIN:

Another item from a hobby store. I just glue it onto the base and cut the excess with plastic cutters. Brass Chain is thin and rather frail so it does not damage the cutters.

PCV:

Awesome, hobby friendly and easy to use material. It comes in either flat sheets of different thickness, or in prefabricated shapes. For bases I usually use flat sheets, gluing them onto the base, then cutting to fit the edge. In case of Necromunda bases – there’s plenty of industrial texture already, so I uused a prefabricated piece of PCV to add here and there. Same technique – glue onto the base, then cut to match the edge.

GW BITZ:

Everybody has some. For Necromunda bases I preffered thin, long spears and banner poles. I just glued them over certain areas and cut with a plastic cutters to match the edge of the base and add variety to the base’s surface.

SKULLS:

Games Workshop’s Skulls set is something that everyone should get. If you haven’t got yours – damn – just go and order one. For what you get the price is just insane. Either way – some Skulls on the base would certainly make it stand out.

ASTROGRANITE DEBRIS:

Actually any grain-texture paint would do just fine. I used Astrogranit Debris cause I don’t have many uses for this particular colour and here it is meant to go under a black undercoat anyway. I applied small amount to certain places, just to add texture.

HOBBY DRILL:

I drilled some holes in different sizes here and there to look like corrosion or some form of acid damage. Easy to do – looks cool once painted.

 

So, there’s that. These are just few ways to enchance Necromunda bases. I bet you can find a lot more ways to differentiate the set. Here’s how mine looks like after the above additions:

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Nazroth

November 2017

November was a tough month for me. It started pretty well with a single Warzone miniature project. This was a prize support for a local event and I had great time focusing on a single miniature. Then some nice additions to Thomas’s Peculiar Collection. First the Warhammer 40,000 Orks which turned out extremely sattysfying. Next came Warhammer 40,000 Dark Eldar. More and more miniatures joined the collection with some Chaos Daemons and O&G Squigs being next in line. Then I suddenly fell ill and this literally stoped my hobbying dead till December. I hope to get better soon and paint some…

WARZONE DARK LEGION GOLIATH ‘Witness Me!’ – View gallery…

WH40K ORKS ‘Chrome & Shiny’ -View gallery…

Thomas’s Peculiar Collection: Creatures – View gallery…

WH40K DARK ELDAR ‘Fast & furious’ – View gallery…

 

 

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