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Monthly Archives:June 2017


“The Colony” – an Infinity gaming board project that streaches in time and space.

Yes – The Colony Special Project lives on and dayum! I almost run out of space to store it! Last time (“THE COLONY” SPECIAL PROJECT part nine) I was pretty sure that once I airbrush a bit here and there, The Colony would finally be completed. Imagine my surprise when I saw how the project expanded since last article. So, let’s dive straight into it…


Leave no MDF behind

It finally happened – The Colony is now fully painted with no MDF, be it white or regular, visible. The project was set aside for few months, when all of a sudden I got new buildings from Gingermane and painted them to match my existing set. I then followed through with all the rest including bridges, food booths, walls and ad stands. Fortunatelly for me, Bocian from Gingermane is a cool bruh of mine and he cut thin paper pieces to cover all illustrations adorning his designs. I only had to take care to cover plexi elements by myself. Once done – my work went fast and easy. Few evenings was all it took.

Urban Peaks

The Colony is vast already, but there’s always room for some extra terrain pieces. With new Gingermane designs appearing every month it’s difficult to stop expanding . It gets even harder, as he let’s me peek on work in progress designs and I sometimes get to buy some before release. Obviously when I saw ‘SF024 The Tower’ I freaked out and demanded these be handed to me emmediately. Gosh how I love these two…

Moarrr Crates

Another addition to The Colony – ‘SF010 Cargo Crates’. Slowly my own designs and scrap-built scenery are forced off the gaming board. I don’t mind it, cause at this point I’m already hooked on Gingermane’s stuff either way 😛

Dark Adjustements

With ‘SF024 The Tower’ I intorudced black/grey colour to The Colony’s overall scheme. It seem to compliment the board so I followed up on this, going back to older scenery pieces. I wander if these, once paper box, buildings will ever rest…


One day ‘The Colony’ will be finished, but seeing how it changes time and time again I can only say TO BE CONTINUED…




Here are some Colour Recipes for Nomads from GALLERY: INFINITY OPERATION ICE STORM. Please take note that this is a simple colour scheme, not covering multiple overlapping layers and blends inbetween, that lead to the final product. It is supposed to be used as guidline not a step-by-step.

RED armour & uniforms:

Black Undercoat,

Scarlet Red (Val), *

Orange Brown (Val), *

Red RLM 23 (Val), *

Elf Skintone (Val), l&p

Red Tone Ink (AP),

Hot Orange (Val), B

Lugganath Orange (GW), L&p

BLACK/GREY outfits & weapons:

Black Undercoat,

Skavenblight Dinge (GW),

Fenrisian Grey (GW),

Pallid Wych Flesh (GW), l&p

Dark Tone Ink (AP),

Pallid Wych Flesh (GW), l&p

White, l&p

LIGHT GREY outfits:

Black/Grey outfits +

Pallid Wych Flesh (GW), l&p

Pale Grey Wash (Val),

Off White (Val), l&p


Bugmans Glow (GW),

Dwarf Flesh (GW),

Flesh (Val),

Mix Strong Tone Ink (AP) 1:1 Soft Tone Ink (AP),

Flesh (Val) l&p,

GREEN lights:

Sick Green (VAL),

Escorpena Green (VAL),

MIX: Escorpena Green (VAL) 1:1 Off White (VAL), l&p

Waywatcher Green (GW), glaze

Light Livery green (VAL), blend

l&p – lines and points,

p – points,

b – blend,

drbr – drybrush,

flbr – flatbrush,

stpl – stippling,

*Airbrushed (with multiple layers and mixes)


February 2018

Captain’s log – after months of being enslaved by Panoceania, there is no hope left for me… hahaha! More Panoceania ‘Chrome & Shiny’ miniatures follow last month’s entry thus closing the project for some time. Painting blue was crowned with a jewel of Joan D’Arc ‘Heroes Never Die!’, being the Special Project of the month. To keep my colour spectrum perception balanced, I have managed to throw in some miniatures of my own. Infinity Nomads are now reinforced with nine new miniatures, including a tiny Special Project of Mursi Lip Plate HVT. I know everyone expect me to renounce Panoceania superiority and swore not to bring more Pano miniatures next month – but there’s an Operation: Ice Storm set being painted right now so… just this last time hahaha… March – here I come!


Infinity NEOTERRA ‘Witness Me!’ – View gallery…

Infinity JOAN D’ARC ‘Heroes Never Die!’ – View gallery…

Infinity NOMADS – View gallery…



Painting skin – nightmare for some, EZ for others. Back in the days I’ve struggled with a proper skin tone, my miniatures turning out too dark, or skin being overall flat and uninterresting. Practicing ‘Five Layers Technique‘ for many years, led me to some realisations and now I am able to present to you my ultimate way of basic skin painting.


* Regular Brush,

* Bugmans Glow (GW),

* Dwarf Flesh (GW),

* Flesh (Val AIR),

* Strong Tone Ink (AP),

* Soft Tone Ink (AP),

* Pale Flesh (Val),

!  You can achieve similar results using different paints and avoiding mixes, as long as you follow Five Layers Technique basics. For example Bugmans Glow (GW) might be switched for Tanned Flesh (AP) or Tan (Vallejo).

!  You can start by applying first layer on any surface. This method does not require any special preparation, like re-painting surface to primer black etc.

1  I started by applying an underlayer of Bugmans Glow paint over any surface destined to become skin. This layer might be a bit messy and is not meant to be smooth, only to cover entire surface. For this particular layer I encourage thinning the paint a bit to help it flow into recesses.

2  Next I applied a main layer of Dwarf Flesh. This time I tried to keep paint from flowing into recesses and made sure that it will cover all big flat areas.

3  I then applied a layer made of a 1:1 mix of Dwarf Flesh and Flesh over all raised areas. This is suposed to be the first highligh and provides a difference in skin tones over the model. Don't worry if some piant flows into recesses, just try to avoid covering everything with it.

4  Here came the flood of wash. I applied a 1:1 mix of Army Painter's Strong Tone Ink with Soft Tone Ink. As usual I didn't bother to be subtle about it.

5  Once dried, I highlighted skin with a 1:1 mix of Elf Skintone and Pale Flesh. This usually is the final highlight and is meant to POP the skin.

!  If I was to enchance skin a bit and move forward from this point, I would add points of focus with lines and dots of Pale Flesh. Some deeper spots can also be in-lined with Flesh Tone or some brown-ish wash to build contrast but that's for another article.


The Scarhandpainting of War

Thus we may know that there are five essentials for miniatures painting:
He will paint who knows when to paint and when not to paint.
He will paint who knows how to handle both superior and inferior brushes.
He will paint whose paints are mixed on the same palette throughout entire project.
He will paint who, prepared himself, waits to take the project undercoated.
He will paint who has hobby capacity and is not interfered with by the customer.

If you know the miniature and know your paints, you need not fear the result of a hundred paint jobs.

Remember Fifty Shades of Scarhandpainting? Well, it was published an uncountable number of hobby hours and over a thousand painted miniatures ago. Yes – today is my dear Scarhandpainting.com’s second anniversary and guess what – I totally forgot to get myself a present. At least you guys remembered and prepared a fantastic surprise for me: over 220000 visits from more than 90000 different IP’s throughout the year. That literally doubled last year’s results. I’m very excited to see how popular this site is. For me this is the best reward for all the effort put into expanding Blog’s content. It is insane that so many people visit my humble site and for that I thank all of you. Cheers!


Last twelve months were like a constant extatic frenzy of painting new, awesome projects, meeting fantastic people from around the world and hobbying all night long! Must say that this way of life suits me well, creating a variety of means to express myself through hobby. It brings me joy to interact with great people and see how they implement my ideas into their own projects. Sharing projects with an audience keeps me hyped and motivated, while providing tips and advice through hobby related articles helps me focus and grow as a painter. That’s why I plan to continue on a quest to bring even more projects and articles to life.


Looking at all these pictures I can’t help myself but feel satisfied. I’ve painted an entire spectrum of crazy awesome stuff from among both games I love and games I haven’t even heard of before. Some of these have really challenged my skill to the limits, while others felt like visiting a good old friend. If this is how next twelve months would look like then count me in!

At this point I would like to thank all of my friendstomers, without whom this fantastic trip wouldn’t be possible. I appreciate your support, all the hobby chatter and trust you bestowed upon me.

Special thanks to Andreas, Thomas, Jek and Behemoth. I am honoured with your trust and friendship. You have my axe, my bow and my brush!


The number of articles grew exponentially since first anniversary. Below is a list of articles that you found most interresting throughout last twelve months (ordered at random).














With two sharp brushes in hands, chest wet from dripping paint and fierce warcry on my twisted lips I urge you to ‘Witness Me!’ as I face another year of insanely cool projects! What lays ahead cannot be described with simple words. Follow me and see for yourself!



Have you ever woke up after a day of painting, hands searing with agony? Do you shake your paints yourself or use futuristic technology to do it for you? Now in all seriousness – have you ever considered getting a proper paint shaker? I have recently decided to treat myself with one. Below are my thoughts about it…


So yeah – Recently I’ve obtained a ProShaker – Professional Gel Polish and Lacquer Shaker. Before I chose this model I’ve made a short research in the web and compared it with two other popular, hobby friendly shakers: Nadeco Nail Lacquer Shaker and Robart Hobby Paint Shaker. Don’t know much about the company that produces ProShaker but it looked impressive and durable when compared to other two. It also operates at a wider spectrum of movement so I’ve figured it will provide better results. Purchased via AliExpress, got here in (wow!) just four days and so far I am happy about it, but first things first.


Inside the box there are:

* Liquid Shaker’s main body, wraped in a double cardboard casing,

* Power plug,

* Spare springs,

* Quick start manual,


Made mostly out of hard, lacquered metal, with sturdy plastic parts and mechanism hidden in a special compartment – ProShaker seems to be of a good quality and durable. It’s simplicity wotks as an advantage as there are not many parts that can get damaged. The main body is very heavy (seems like about 5kg) and holds in place while working. Power plug is a standard issue, nothing special – it can be easily replaced if broken. I’m not especially fond of a on/off switch, would preffer a more solid, plastic button – but this one does it’s job so I’ll give it a free pass.


ProShaker is very simple to use – just put a paint into the holder and cap it, switch on, wait 60 seconds till it automatically switches off. The holder works fine with Army Painter, Vallejo, Games Workshop and even P3 bottles. Advertised to perform with about 500 rotations per minute – In my opinion it seems more like 4 per second, which gives about half the declared speed – still quite good.

One thing that I find unpleasant about ProShaker’s performance is the noise. It has nothing to do with ‘Smooth, quiet operation’ proudly displayed on the box – and is rather annoying. This might be because I have a brand new piece and it’ll take some time before it lubricates properly. If not – I will use a special spray grease and it should tone the noise down a notch.

Once ‘shaked’ the paint is mixed pretty well. ProShaker managed to effectively mix even a Games Workshop’s ‘dry’ paint, which is a deed in itself. It works especially well with paints that have a pigmentation issue – something that requires a lot of work to properly mix.


ProShaker is an expensive toy. Prices varry between 90$ and up to 170$. Add to it a shipment cost and potential customs and damn – this thing is not for everyone. Still, the quality seems worth it, especially when compared to competition.

From what I’ve seen there are two major competitors to ProShaker, that provide similar results.

Nadeco Nail Lacquer Shaker

It comes in many variations. Price between 20$ and 40$ is certainly a big advantage over a ProShaker, but the quality is clearly inferior. Type of movement is limited to left-right vibration.


Robart Hobby Paint Shaker

This seems to be the same thing as the one above, altho it is nicely reskined and priced over 40$ and up to 70$. Casing looks way better than Nadeco, but I couldn;t find any information about the material it is made of. This one is based in the USA so it’s way more expensive for poor folks in the EU due to customs – have that in mind.


Assuming price not being an issue, the question you should ask yourself when considering such a toy is – would it really be optimal for you. It’s nothing more but pure economy of work. In my line of work I simply do not have time to ‘masturbate’ my paints, looking outside the window all day long. Time is of an essence, not to mention hands fatigue – I’d rather paint. On top of that there are results, which in case of some types of paints are impressive. So – there’s that.


One important thing that comes to mind is the power plug. I have seen over a dozen AliExpress and Ebay offers, where there was no choice nor information as to what type of a power plug is in the box. In the end I purchased from a seller that provided a choice between EU/UK/US power plug – but be advised to check this out before getting one yourself.


After using ProShaker throughout entire day of painting I’d say I am pretty happy with my new toy. Yes, price is an overkill and that goes for every shaker mentioned in the article, but like most lasting professional hobby tools – this is a once in a lifetime purchase. From now on I can spend more time with miniatures and less time shaking paints. If I was to tag this purchase on a scale where 10 is life changing, 8 is good, 6 is ok, 5 is mediocre, 3 is bad and I don’t want to even mention 1 – taking quality, price and performance into consideration – I would settle for a 7. That’s because I was expecting a bit more with some particular paints, but also got good results with most of them. Let’s just say – money well spent.

Agree/Disagree? There’s a comment section below where you can stand for your opinion 😉


January 2018

‘I’m blue da ba dee da ba daa’ – and that’s more or less how I spent January. Two projects, both Infinity the Game related, in a similar colour scheme. One pretty small, yet important, being an extension to Panoceania ‘Chrome & Shiny’ collection, the other grand and marvelous – Neoterra ‘Witness Me!’ – that I wasn’t able to finish in just one month, so expect more of these blue dudesmen to follow soon. Now it is official – I am a real life Panoceania artificer 😛

Infinity NEOTERRA ‘Witness Me!’ – View gallery…

Infinity PANOCEANIA ‘Chrome & Shiny’ – View gallery…



How about I show you a technique to paint brown military coats like a pro in a way so simple that it’ll make you wander why haven’t you painted like that before? Below is a simple Step-by-step tutorial on how to achieve awesome tattered and used up leather brown coat effect in just few simple steps.

First some home brewed theory.

Stippling: A technique of creating texture out of dozens of tiny dots of paint. Easiest way to achieve this is to use a Stippling Brush (round head, tip cut off – flat surface instead, resilient hair).

Blending: A technique of gently intermingling two or more colors to create a gradual transition or to soften lines. Below I will demonstrate a rather crude version of it.


* Stippling Brush (GW),

* Regular Brush,

* Olive Drab (Vallejo AIR),

* Pallid Wych Flesh (GW),

* Strong Tone Ink (AP),

1  You can start painting this on any dark surface, but for good result I recommend to prepare the surface, by following steps 1 to 3 of Painting 'Infinity' Black Tutorial. This will transition into a complex and interresting surface to work on. On a bright side neither these nor following layers require precision and are really fast to paint.


2  Time to stipple. I used a Stippling brush and Pallid Wych Flesh paint. I left the excess paint on the palette and randomly applied some dots onto the coat.

3  Next I mixed Olive Drab 1:1 with Strong Tone Ink and applied it all over the coat. This is the crude version of blending I mentioned earlier. It has not much to do with actual blending technique, except it changes the color and actually 'blends'.

4  Wash comes last. I applied a strong, wet layer of Strong Tone Ink all over the coat. Once dry - paint job is done.

!  This might be the end to it, but if you preffer to take your paint job to a higher level you can for example 'edge' the coat with a brighter brown/leathery colour. From now on you have a great looking base to add detail to and it was achieved in no time.






Third time’s a charm thus welcome to the third ‘Painting Philosophy’ article, where “I let you in on ‘how’ and especially ‘why’ I do some things in a certain way. In my opinion a proper approach to painting is crucial to maintain healthy and rewarding experience. Final result depends on it in the same way as on techniques, know-how and tools used. Nowadays internet is full of painting tutorials yet it takes some inner understanding of our own capabilities to find what suits us best and fully benefit from all acquired knowledge. That being said – In this series I will reveal what works best for me as a painter. I hope you will find some wisdom in it…”


In last article I wrote a lot about the edge of a base and what it represents. Do not let yourself get fooled by a similar title tho, as today I would like to take a slightly different approach. I introduce to you the ‘Edging technique’. Something that I myself am addicted to since Games Workshop lured me in with their EDGE paints series. Before that I struggled to keep my colours juicy and interresting enough. Kept to dark, murky colour schemes and avoided any type of lining, including edges. That translated into being a bit dissapointed with my own works – so a not very healthy relationship with paints and miniatures. It all changed once I got my hands on GW’s EDGE paints and that was just the first step which made me realize how important strong edges, combined with proper Lining, are.

What it actually does?

Edging, better known as ‘edge highlighting’ is a technique of applying paint to the natural edges of a surface, providing strong contrast and exposing the mentioned surface. I find Edging, combined with Lining, to be a great way to make a colour pop and literally change how an eye can perceive it. It works especially well with multi-layered surfaces of detailed miniatures but should work for you regardless of what miniatures you paint. Here’s an example of Edging being one of key factors to improove a paint job:

Why this method?

I’m not a guy that looks at miniatures through magnifier glass. I mostly paint projects related with gaming and this kind of miniatures should be able to catch an eye while being used. I like my miniatures to pop, to be sharp and  ‘edgy’. To have personality and coherent colour scheme. For me Edging provides all that and more.

How I do it?

First of all, like with most painting methods, I avoid overloading my brush with too much paint. This is very important as too much paint would run down and ruin a crisp, sharp edge. Other than that I try to:

  • Keep the tip of a brush positioned perpendicularly to the line of the edge and drive it along the edge from from one side to the other. This helps to avoid the tip moving off the edge and paint all around it.

  • Hold a brush near the tip. This gives me a lot of control over the tip and it’s movement.

  • Keep the tip of a brush positioned at about 90 degrees to the edge, which usually keeps it from going point forward and leave paint in recesses.

  • Pick a right paint for the job. This is not limited to GW’s EDGE paints only. Any paint that provides enough contrast, works well with a choosen colour and has enough pigment will do.



Now you know how I approach edge highlighting and with this I would like to close third Painting Philosophy article. Please take note that what works for me, might not necessarily work for you – still there are many ways to accomplish certain things – mine is just one of them. I encourage you to leave some feedback. As usual I put a lot of effort into preparing this article, but if it helps at least one painter out there – I consider it a time well spent.

This would be extremely ‘paitnful’… for you.


December 2017

December, a month that I’ve learned to treat like a 100% free time chillout, lazy PC gaming and family meetings. I had no hobby plans for December whatsoever. Still some projects got accomplished, being: Necromunda: Underhive collection and a small addition to Gingermane.eu’s Haqqislam force. Was this a lot? Difficult to tell, cause both projects were definitely challenging. Good way to close the year – that’s for sure 🙂


Infinity HAQQISLAM ‘Chrome & Shiny’ – View gallery…