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Monthly Archives:May 2016

TUTORIAL: PAINTING BROWN MILITARY COATS

How about I show you a technique to paint brown military coats like a pro in a way so simple that it’ll make you wander why haven’t you painted like that before? Below is a simple Step-by-step tutorial on how to achieve awesome tattered and used up leather brown coat effect in just few simple steps.

First some home brewed theory.

Stippling: A technique of creating texture out of dozens of tiny dots of paint. Easiest way to achieve this is to use a Stippling Brush (round head, tip cut off – flat surface instead, resilient hair).

Blending: A technique of gently intermingling two or more colors to create a gradual transition or to soften lines. Below I will demonstrate a rather crude version of it.

I USED:

* Stippling Brush (GW),

* Regular Brush,

* Olive Drab (Vallejo AIR),

* Oallid Wych Flesh (GW),

* Strong Tone Ink (AP),

1  You can start painting this on any dark surface, but for good result I recommend to prepare the surface, by following steps 1 to 3 of Painting 'Infinity' Black Tutorial. This will transition into a complex and interresting surface to work on. On a bright side neither these nor following layers require precision and are really fast to paint.

TUTORIAL: PAINTING ‘INFINITY’ BLACK

2  Time to stipple. I used a Stippling brush and Pallid Wych Flesh paint. I left the excess paint on the palette and randomly applied some dots onto the coat.

3  Next I mixed Olive Drab 1:1 with Strong Tone Ink and applied it all over the coat. This is the crude version of blending I mentioned earlier. It has not much to do with actual blending technique, except it changes the color and actually 'blends'.

4  Wash comes last. I applied a strong, wet layer of Strong Tone Ink all over the coat. Once dry - paint job is done.

!  This might be the end to it, but if you preffer to take your paint job to a higher level you can for example 'edge' the coat with a brighter brown/leathery colour. From now on you have a great looking base to add detail to and it was achieved in no time.

TUTORIAL: PAINTING EDGES

Disclaimer:

I will add some pictures of finished models, once I’m through with current project. It might take some time tho, as there’s around 70 of them occupying my dest right now. Stay tuned and revisit this article for an update in few weeks. Cheers!

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Nazroth

PAINTING PHILOSOPHY part three EDGE OF TOMORROW

PROLOGUE:

Third time’s a charm thus welcome to the third ‘Painting Philosophy’ article, where “I let you in on ‘how’ and especially ‘why’ I do some things in a certain way. In my opinion a proper approach to painting is crucial to maintain healthy and rewarding experience. Final result depends on it in the same way as on techniques, know-how and tools used. Nowadays internet is full of painting tutorials yet it takes some inner understanding of our own capabilities to find what suits us best and fully benefit from all acquired knowledge. That being said – In this series I will reveal what works best for me as a painter. I hope you will find some wisdom in it…”

PAINTING PHILOSOPHY: EDGING TECHNIQUE

In last article I wrote a lot about the edge of a base and what it represents. Do not let yourself get fooled by a similar title tho, as today I would like to take a slightly different approach. I introduce to you the ‘Edging technique’. Something that I myself am addicted to since Games Workshop lured me in with their EDGE paints series. Before that I struggled to keep my colours juicy and interresting enough. Kept to dark, murky colour schemes and avoided any type of lining, including edges. That translated into being a bit dissapointed with my own works – so a not very healthy relationship with paints and miniatures. It all changed once I got my hands on GW’s EDGE paints and that was just the first step which made me realize how important strong edges, combined with proper Lining, are.

What it actually does?

Edging, better known as ‘edge highlighting’ is a technique of applying paint to the natural edges of a surface, providing strong contrast and exposing the mentioned surface. I find Edging, combined with Lining, to be a great way to make a colour pop and literally change how an eye can perceive it. It works especially well with multi-layered surfaces of detailed miniatures but should work for you regardless of what miniatures you paint. Here’s an example of Edging being one of key factors to improove a paint job:

Why this method?

I’m not a guy that looks at miniatures through magnifier glass. I mostly paint projects related with gaming and this kind of miniatures should be able to catch an eye while being used. I like my miniatures to pop, to be sharp and  ‘edgy’. To have personality and coherent colour scheme. For me Edging provides all that and more.

How I do it?

First of all, like with most painting methods, I avoid overloading my brush with too much paint. This is very important as too much paint would run down and ruin a crisp, sharp edge. Other than that I try to:

  • Keep the tip of a brush positioned perpendicularly to the line of the edge and drive it along the edge from from one side to the other. This helps to avoid the tip moving off the edge and paint all around it.

  • Hold a brush near the tip. This gives me a lot of control over the tip and it’s movement.

  • Keep the tip of a brush positioned at about 90 degrees to the edge, which usually keeps it from going point forward and leave paint in recesses.

  • Pick a right paint for the job. This is not limited to GW’s EDGE paints only. Any paint that provides enough contrast, works well with a choosen colour and has enough pigment will do.

EXAMPLES:

EPILOGUE:

Now you know how I approach edge highlighting and with this I would like to close third Painting Philosophy article. Please take note that what works for me, might not necessarily work for you – still there are many ways to accomplish certain things – mine is just one of them. I encourage you to leave some feedback. As usual I put a lot of effort into preparing this article, but if it helps at least one painter out there – I consider it a time well spent.

This would be extremely ‘paitnful’… for you.

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Nazroth

December 2017

December, a month that I’ve learned to treat like a 100% free time chillout, lazy PC gaming and family meetings. I had no hobby plans for December whatsoever. Still some projects got accomplished, being: Necromunda: Underhive collection and a small addition to Gingermane.eu’s Haqqislam force. Was this a lot? Difficult to tell, cause both projects were definitely challenging. Good way to close the year – that’s for sure 🙂

NECROMUNDA: UNDERHIVE – View gallery…

Infinity HAQQISLAM ‘Chrome & Shiny’ – View gallery…

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Nazroth

PAINTING PHILOSOPHY part two INTO DARKNESS

PROLOGUE:

This is a second installment in the ‘Painting Philosophy’ series in which I let you in on ‘how’ and especially ‘why’ I do some things in a certain way. “In my opinion a proper approach to painting is crucial to maintain healthy and rewarding experience. Final result depends on it in the same way as on techniques, know-how and tools used. Nowadays internet is full of painting tutorials yet it takes some inner understanding of our own capabilities to find what suits us best and fully benefit from all acquired knowledge. That being said – In this series I will reveal what works best for me as a painter. I hope you will find some wisdom in it…”

PAINTING PHILOSOPHY: THE EDGE

The edge, a plastic frontier between a piece of art and the rest of the world. It divides a miniature from the surrounding chaos. It defines the paint job. It underlines the final result of your work, enchancing the visual effect. In short, a properly painted edge of a base will enclose the miniature just like a frame around a painting. Can you imagine a ‘Mona Lisa’ in a dirty styrofoam frame? Well, that’s what I see each time I look upon a picture of awesomely painted miniature on a base, with dirty, unprepared edge. No matter the quality of paint job, a piece of art turns into a kid with chocolate smeared all over it’s face. I just can’t appreciate ‘that’. But is the difference so evident? Don’t take my word for it – see for yourself…

This actually IS the exact same miniature, with the only exception of one base’s edge being covered with a dirty base edge photoshoped from a work in progress picture. But enough about ‘how I feel’ and let’s skip to ‘how I do’. For me there’s only one paint capable of fully POPing a miniature on the battlefield and it’s BLACK!

Why this colour?

In light spectrum black is not even a colour per se, being an ultimate lack of colour instead. In the world of hobby paints black is technically a colour, due to pigments used to create black paint. This particular colour will work with whatever colour scheme you choose for a miniature, enhancing the effect of what’s on the base. It is worth mentioning, that black paint usually surpases other colours when it comes to opacity, therefore it is much easier to provide a smooth, opaque layer using black than most other paints.

How I do it?

I go about it in a simple, oldschool manner – with regular medium sized brush and a good, trusted paint. After testing a lot of different black paints I chose Vallejo 74.602 Negro Surface Primer. It works great both with brush and surface. Usually one layer is all that is needed to fully cover the edge, if not – second one is always enough. This paint leaves a nice, smooth, thick layer, hiding some irregularities that might happen to cover the edge of the base. It is worth pointing out, that the base’s edge is always the last thing I paint, before finishing a project. First I thoroughly clean up my painting space of any project leftovers, then I apply varnish and just then move to painting black edges. This way both Varnish and edges are clear of any dust particles and unwanted stuff that might stick to them.

What if...?

How do I deal with a situation, when a game requires the base to be marked / split or otherwise painted so that the arc of vision or other feature is clearly visible? I preffer to either:

* Use a modelled on-base feature to clearly indicate the direction a miniature is facing,

* Use a marker instead,

When painting a project for someone else I’m sometimes asked to add an ‘arc of sight’ on the base’s edge. If possible I provide small markings to minimize the other colour’s impact on the otherwise black edge. This seems to work pretty well and keeps the initial feel of a miniature being underlined.

 

EPILOGUE:

So here we are, at an end of the second installment in the Painting Philosophy – a series that is meant to ‘infect’ you with some of my hobby ideals. Hope you found this one interresting and helpful.

As usual – I have put a lot of effort into preparing for this article, yet I am sure I missed something important. If you happen to have any questions or suggestions related to it – feel free to hit me with them. Also take note that what works for me, might not necessarily work for you – still there are many ways to accomplish certain things – mine is just one of them.

All right, sweethearts, you’re a team and there’s nothin’ to worry about. We come here, and we gonna conquer, and we gonna paint some, is that understood? That’s what we gonna do, sweethearts, we are going to go and paint some. All right, people, on the ready line! Are ya lean?

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Nazroth

COLOUR RECIPE: NECROMUNDA UNDERHIVE SCENERY

Here are some Colour Recipes for Necromunda scenery pieces from GALLERY: NECROMUNDA UNDERHIVE. Please take note that this is a simple colour scheme, not covering multiple overlapping layers and blends inbetween, that lead to the final product. It is supposed to be used as guidline not a step-by-step.

METAL:

Black Undercoat,

Skavenblight Dinge (GW), *

Gun Metal (AP),

Shining Silver (AP),

Strong Tone Ink (AP),

Shining Silver (AP), l&p

Streaking Grime (AK),

ORANGE’ish elements:

Black Undercoat,

Cavalry Brown (Val), *

Orange Brown (Val), *

Strong Tone Ink (AP),

Orange Brown (Val), stpl

Lugganath Orange (GW), l&p

Streaking Grime (AK), GREEN lights:

Duck Egg Green (Val), *

Light Livery Green (Val), *

Waywatcher Green (GW),

Off White (Val), l&p

Dwarf Flesh (GW),

l&p – lines and points,

p – points,

b – blend,

drbr – drybrush,

flbr – flatbrush,

stpl – stippling,

*Airbrushed (with multiple layers and mixes)

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Nazroth

TUTORIAL: ENHANCING NECROMUNDA BASES

Necromunda: Underhive is a game full of nicely detailed plastic miniatures. As much as I hate endorsing Games Workshop – It should be mentioned that in terms of miniatures – they did a really nice job, extending the set so that it includes 25 industrial themed plastic bases. I appreciate this move from GW, even tho the variety of Necromunda bases designs is scarce. For example my own set came with just two versions among a total of ten bases. This is where I come in with a Tutorial on how to Enchance Necromunda bases in a fast, simple way. Below you will find few ideas on how to do it – but let me say this in advance: keep an open mind cause there’s plenty of awesome stuff that can be used to differentiate your Necromunda bases set (and actually any Industrial bases).

I USED:

  • Hobby Knife,
  • Scissors,
  • Plastic Cutter,
  • Hobby Drill,
  • Super Glue,
  • Brass Mesh,
  • Brass Chain,
  • PCV,
  • Games Workshop bitz,
  • Games Workshop skulls,
  • Astrogranite Debris Texture Paint,

 

BRASS MESH:

This stuff can be found in most modellers hobby stores. Personally I love it, cause it let’s me add awesome texture to the bases. It is very easy to use. I tend to cut a piece of mesh with scissors and glue it onto a designated surface, leaving an excess to hang outside the base. Once Super Glue dries out I just cut the excess mesh with scissors and file it on the edge – driving a file from top to bottom of the bases edge. This keeps the mesh glued onto the base, but smoothers the edge nicely.

BRASS CHAIN:

Another item from a hobby store. I just glue it onto the base and cut the excess with plastic cutters. Brass Chain is thin and rather frail so it does not damage the cutters.

PCV:

Awesome, hobby friendly and easy to use material. It comes in either flat sheets of different thickness, or in prefabricated shapes. For bases I usually use flat sheets, gluing them onto the base, then cutting to fit the edge. In case of Necromunda bases – there’s plenty of industrial texture already, so I uused a prefabricated piece of PCV to add here and there. Same technique – glue onto the base, then cut to match the edge.

GW BITZ:

Everybody has some. For Necromunda bases I preffered thin, long spears and banner poles. I just glued them over certain areas and cut with a plastic cutters to match the edge of the base and add variety to the base’s surface.

SKULLS:

Games Workshop’s Skulls set is something that everyone should get. If you haven’t got yours – damn – just go and order one. For what you get the price is just insane. Either way – some Skulls on the base would certainly make it stand out.

ASTROGRANITE DEBRIS:

Actually any grain-texture paint would do just fine. I used Astrogranit Debris cause I don’t have many uses for this particular colour and here it is meant to go under a black undercoat anyway. I applied small amount to certain places, just to add texture.

HOBBY DRILL:

I drilled some holes in different sizes here and there to look like corrosion or some form of acid damage. Easy to do – looks cool once painted.

 

So, there’s that. These are just few ways to enchance Necromunda bases. I bet you can find a lot more ways to differentiate the set. Here’s how mine looks like after the above additions:

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Nazroth

November 2017

November was a tough month for me. It started pretty well with a single Warzone miniature project. This was a prize support for a local event and I had great time focusing on a single miniature. Then some nice additions to Thomas’s Peculiar Collection. First the Warhammer 40,000 Orks which turned out extremely sattysfying. Next came Warhammer 40,000 Dark Eldar. More and more miniatures joined the collection with some Chaos Daemons and O&G Squigs being next in line. Then I suddenly fell ill and this literally stoped my hobbying dead till December. I hope to get better soon and paint some…

WARZONE DARK LEGION GOLIATH ‘Witness Me!’ – View gallery…

WH40K ORKS ‘Chrome & Shiny’ -View gallery…

Thomas’s Peculiar Collection: Creatures – View gallery…

WH40K DARK ELDAR ‘Fast & furious’ – View gallery…

 

 

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Nazroth

TUTORIAL: DIY INFINITY CAMO MARKERS

In this article I would like to present to you an easy way to prepare and then paint your own Camo Markers for Infinity the Game.

I USED:

  • PCV
  • Ruler
  • Pencil
  • Hobby Knife
  • 25mm Bases

 

PREPARATION:

Obviously, the preparation process was pretty simple. Using a ruler, pencil and hobby knife I first drawn and then cut  five 25x47mm rectangles made of PCV. I then glued them on top of 25mm round bases. At this point Camo Markers were ready to get painted.

PAINTING:

1  First step was to undercoat entire Camo Markers with Vallejo's Desert Tan.

2  Next I used a piece of synthetic hair holder as a stencil and airbrushed Vallejo Light Brown over the Markers.

3  Then I switched to Vallejo Earth and airbrushed it over the markers using a piece of net that I got patatoes in. This net should be easily obtainable in every grocery store and makes for a really cool stencil.

4  I then got back to hair holder stencil and airbrushed a layer of Vallejo Light Grey Green.

5  Next I airbrushed points of Vallejo Dark Flesh.

6  Some wet stippling went next. First I applied clumsy dots of Vallejo German Red Brown, then did the same with Games Workshop Pallid Wych Flesh. Afterwards I used Pallid Wych Flesh to mark edges of the markers and provide number to distinguish them from one another on the gaming board.

7  Basing came last. I used Games Workshop Agrellan Earth and Agrellan Badland, then drybrushed them with Karak Stone and Flayed One Flesh. Work done.

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Nazroth

TUTORIAL: KEEPING YOUR BRUSHES ALIVE

Ever wandered how a brush graveyard looks like? Some of us seen this wast field of broken, damaged brushes – left aside without purpose. A truly sad sight to behold. Now you’re probably looking at the sharp tip of your favorite brush thinking “It won’t happen to you my dear friend. This doesn’t concern you.” Sorry to be a bringer of bad news, but brushes come and go – no way around it. The only thing we can do is to preserve their longevity as much as possible. How to it? The sole purpose of this article is to share some tips that might help you enjoy your brush till it’s late veteranship and avoid this:

Brush Care:

On top of thorough cleaning after each use, the proper care is the key to preserve brush’s shape and thus function. It’s not something to repeat at daily basis, still every now and then a “brush spa”should be performed. Here’s how I do it:

I USED:

  • Airbrush Cleaner
  • Soap
  • Hair repair conditioner
  • Water
  • Paper Towels
  • Small cup

1  First I poured Airbrush Cleaner into a small cup. Next I dipped a tip of the brush, tapping it against a bottom of the cup. The purpose of this step is to ensure that any dried out paint leftovers would get removed from the brush's tip. Once done I cleaned up the tip and metal part of the brush's handle with a paper towel soaked in Airbrush Cleaner. I did this by slowly pulling the brush through the towel, forming it's tip.

2  Step two was to gently clean the tip with soaped fingers and wash it with water.

3  Then I moved to step three, covering the tip with a hair repair conditioner. Then I left the brush to soak with conditioner for about 20 minutes.

4  The final step was to once again clean the brush with water and form the tip, using a paper towel.

Now my brushes rest happily in a brush cup, smiling to me in wait for next project…

Brush Necromancy:

Ok, so you can take care of your brushes to keep them healthy, but what if they’re already ‘on the other side’? Untill recently I was sure that there’s no comming back from the brush’s afterlife, but I was prooven wrong by a friend who linked me a crazy awesome tutorial – and now I will share it with you.

I USED:

  • Iron (yes, like for Ironing clothes)
  • Water

1  I dipped the brush in water...

2  I touched a wet tip of the brush to the hot iron, then started moving it backwards, gently turning it in one direction.

Well – that’s it! Sounds easy? It actually is XD Just take a look at this video…

 

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Nazroth

“THE COLONY” SPECIAL PROJECT part nine

Six months is a lot of time to gather material for another project related article, and thus  The Colony Special Project is back with entire new installment about this Infinity gaming board. I just couldn’t leave this project unattended for much longer.

THE COLONY - part nine: CONTAINING THEME

Cutting Colours

Let me start by telling you this: I love my gaming board. That being said, at some point I felt like something didn’t quite bangt right. The board was finished, I got a lot of awesome, positive feedback about it, still deep down I felt something is off. There’s always place for improvement so my inner artist raged while being unable to pinpoint the exact reason of my discomfort. It took a while for me to understand that the board looked too chaotic to absorb. All the yellow, blue and deep clear-red did not work well with White-Sand-Orange-Green colour scheme.

I started introducing changes by dumping the obvious source of unfitting colours – the Holo Ads, and adding more green to the board with brand new set of Antenocitis Ad Stands. It partially worked but I wasn’t fully satisfied with the result…

The real change sweeped throughout The Colony quite suddenly. Everything, and I can’t stress this enough, because of the Gingermane Studio and it’s scenery. Long story short – there is this guy for whom I paint some Infinity miniatures, and one day he is like ‘I’m designing some scenery pieces, what you think?’ and I’m like ‘OMG I love this shit!’ and he’s like ‘Wanna grab some?’ and I’m like ‘Duuh! Shut up and take my money!’… All of the sudden I find myself knee deep in Gingermane’s scenery pieces which not only look amazing, but also fit right into my gaming board’s theme. They seem to be plucked straight out  of my deepest desires – both in case of looks and playability.

This was the exact point at which I decided to finally ‘repair the damage’ I done to my gaming board and contain the colour palette of all the stuff that appears on it…

The final decision was made: Coloured Plexi Ads adorning the buildings had to go. Upon reaching this conclusion I instantly contacted my besties from Micro Art Studio and ordered a huge pile of replacement pieces. I’ve figured that a bigger version of ’rounded orange piece’ would work the best for the theme and overall looks. Soon after, I got a delivery of more than a hundred pieces necessary to finalize the ‘grand change’…

Farewell Plexi

Preparing these was harsh. Had to clean them all of soot leftovers and remove small pieces left inside some of the laser-cut holes. Once done I painted all the pieces in a single go, then swaped Plexi Ads with them. The result is exactly how I hoped for.

Epilogue

The road to perfect gaming table streches before me and it’ll take some time till I get there, but I can see the destination. What’s left for me to do is to add dots of Vallejo’s Sandy Yellow here and there to tone down the Gingermane’s white a bit. Afterwards The Colony should be finally complete… at least for some time. I promiss to bring you more of The Colony in next installment – probably six months from now :P.

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Nazroth